Identidad social y procesos de adaptación de niños víctimas de violencia política en Colombia

Translated title of the contribution: Social identity and adjustment processes of child victims of political violence in Colombia

Angela Victoria Vera-Márquez, Jorge Enrique Palacio Sañudo, Isidro Maya Jariego, Daniel Holgado Ramos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

An analysis is made on the process of psychological and sociocultural adaptation of children in situations of forced displacement. This includes identifying the factors promoting and preventing adaptation, and the impact of their social identity in this process, from the perspective of Berry's (1997) theory of acculturation and the theory of social identity by Tajfel and Turner (1987). This qualitative study is a secondary analysis undertaken from the perspective of thick description (Geertz, 2000). A total of 26 interviews were conducted, with the interviewees being children and parents in situations of forced displacement, as well as teachers, students and parents of a school community with high reception of displaced population. The content analysis technique was used in the processing of information. The results suggest that emotional support contributes to adaptation, mainly because it promotes the psychological sense of community. On the other hand, the important role of the school in achieving processes of inclusion and integration strategies is shown, as it that can promote the well-being of child victims of political violence.

Translated title of the contributionSocial identity and adjustment processes of child victims of political violence in Colombia
Original languageSpanish
Pages (from-to)167-176
Number of pages10
JournalRevista Latinoamericana de Psicologia
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

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