Validity and Reliability of the Columbia Health Screen (CHS),Instrument of the Youth Mental Health and Suicide Screening program of Rosario University, Bogota, a Subsidiary of the Columbia University TeenScreen Program

Milciades Ibanez Pinilla, Isabel Regina Perez Olmos, Vladimir Jacob Gómez Carrillo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVES To evaluate the validity and reliability of the Spanish version of Columbia Health Screen (CHS) of the Columbia University TeenScreenProgram implemented in 2009 by the Youth Mental Health Program at the Universidad del Rosario in the 8th grade of a private school inBogota´, Colombia.
METHODS An observational design of a diagnostic screening test applied to 183 students. Evaluation of the reproducibility of the test applied after aninterval of 20 days to a randomized proportional subsample of 63 students.
RESULTS The CHS showed a high sensitivity (100%) and adequate specificity (89.09%), positive predictive value of 85.88%, and negative predictivevalue of 100%, which gives adequate validity. These values might be influenced by a high prevalence of 39.9% of mental health or/andsuicidal behaviors (ideation and attempt) risks. The reliability and internal consistency of the test are good, Cronbach’s alpha .700, and alsothe concordance of the CHS and the clinical interview (kappa .867, standard error of .037;PB.001). The reproducibility showed a kappaindex of .645 in the subsample assessed 20 days later.
CONCLUSIONS The Spanish version of the CHS, Columbia University TeenScreen Program, has adequate reliability and validity to detect signs of suicidalbehavior and mental illness symptoms in adolescents.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalMind & Brain, el Journal of Psychiatry
Volume2
StatePublished - 2012

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