Spatial patterns associated with the distribution of immature stages of Aedes aegypti in three dengue high-risk municipalities of Southwestern Colombia

Cristina Sánchez Gutierrez, Erika Santamaría, Carlos Andrés Morales, María Camila Lesmes, Horacio Cadena, Alvaro Avila-Diaz, Patricia Fuya, Catalina Marceló-Díaz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are the main vector of human arbovirosis in tropical and subtropical areas. Their adaptation to urban and rural environments generates infestations inside households. Therefore, entomological surveillance associated with spatio-temporal analysis is an innovative approach for vector control and dengue management. Here, our main aim was to inspect immature pupal stages in households belonging to municipalities at high risk of dengue in Cauca, Colombia, by implementing entomological indices and relating how they influence adult mosquitos' density. We provide novel data for the geographical distribution of 3,806 immature pupal stages of Ae. aegypti. We also report entomological indices and spatial characterization. Our results suggest that, for Ae. aegypti species, pupal productivity generates high densities of adult mosquitos in neighbouring households, evidencing seasonal behaviour. Our dataset is essential as it provides an innovative strategy for mitigating vector-borne diseases using vector spatial patterns. It also delineates the association between these vector spatial patterns, entomological indicators, and breeding sites in high-risk neighbourhoods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalGigaByte
Volume95
DOIs
StatePublished - 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology (miscellaneous)
  • Biotechnology
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Medicine

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