What is next after the genes for autoimmunity?

John Castiblanco, Mauricio Arcos-Burgos, Juan-Manuel Anaya

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo de revisión

18 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Clinical pathologies draw us to envisage disease as either an independent entity or a diverse set of traits governed by common physiopathological mechanisms, prompted by environmental assaults throughout life. Autoimmune diseases are not an exception, given they represent a diverse collection of diseases in terms of their demographic profile and primary clinical manifestations. Although they are pleiotropic outcomes of non-specific disease genes underlying similar immunogenetic mechanisms, research generally focuses on a single disease. Drastic technologic advances are leading research to organize clinical genomic multidisciplinary approaches to decipher the nature of human biological systems. Once the currently costly omic-based technologies become universally accessible, the way will be paved for a cleaner picture to risk quantification, prevention, prognosis and diagnosis, allowing us to clearly define better phenotypes always ensuring the integrity of the individuals studied. However, making accurate predictions for most autoimmune diseases is an ambitious challenge, since the understanding of these pathologies is far from complete. Herein, some pitfalls and challenges of the genetics of autoimmune diseases are reviewed, and an approximation to the future of research in this field is presented.

Idioma originalEnglish (US)
Páginas (desde-hasta)197
PublicaciónBMC Medicine
Volumen11
DOI
EstadoPublished - sep 4 2013

Huella dactilar

Autoimmunity
Autoimmune Diseases
Genes
Research
Immunogenetics
Inborn Genetic Diseases
Clinical Pathology
Demography
Pathology
Technology
Phenotype

Citar esto

Castiblanco, John ; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio ; Anaya, Juan-Manuel. / What is next after the genes for autoimmunity?. En: BMC Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 11. pp. 197.
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What is next after the genes for autoimmunity? / Castiblanco, John; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Anaya, Juan-Manuel.

En: BMC Medicine, Vol. 11, 04.09.2013, p. 197.

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo de revisión

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