The Role of Civil Society Actors in Peacemaking

The Case of Guatemala

Roddy Brett

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

Resumen

This article builds upon recent scholarship in critical peace studies that focuses on the role of civil society actors in formal peacemaking processes, in short, peace talks, and post-conflict peacebuilding. The article specifically explores the role of civil society actors in the Guatemalan peace process. The research addresses the possible tensions and potential complementarities in processes where civil society enjoys a mandated role in centralised, formal peace negotiations carried out between the state and armed actors in talks levied within the liberal peace framework. In the case of Guatemala, non-state actors participated to an unprecedented extent in the peace negotiations, and Guatemala has not relapsed into armed conflict. However, post-conflict Guatemala is a violent and unstable country. Consequently, the study challenges the assumption that peacemaking is necessarily more successful in those instances where provisions have been established to guarantee the participation of civil society.

Idioma originalEnglish (US)
Páginas (desde-hasta)49-64
Número de páginas16
PublicaciónJournal of Peacebuilding and Development
Volumen12
N.º1
DOI
EstadoPublished - abr 24 2017
Publicado de forma externa

Huella dactilar

Guatemala
civil society
peace negotiation
peace
peace process
guarantee
participation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Safety Research
  • Political Science and International Relations

Citar esto

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The Role of Civil Society Actors in Peacemaking : The Case of Guatemala. / Brett, Roddy.

En: Journal of Peacebuilding and Development, Vol. 12, N.º 1, 24.04.2017, p. 49-64.

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

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