Strategies for developing multi-epitope, subunit-based, chemically synthesized anti-malarial vaccines

M. E. Patarroyo, G. Cifuentes, A. Bermúdez, M. A. Patarroyo

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

24 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

An anti-malarial vaccine against the extremely lethal Plasmodium falciparum is desperately needed. Peptides from this parasite's proteins involved in invasion and having high red blood cell-binding ability were identified; these conserved peptides were not immun genic or protection-inducing when used for immunizing Aotus monkeys. Modifying some critical binding residues in these high-activi binding peptides' (HABPs') attachment to red blood cells (RBC) allowed them to induce immunogenicity and protection against expermental challenge and acquire the ability to bind to specific HLA-DRp1* alleles. These modified HABPs adopted certain characterist structural configurations as determined by circular dichroism (CD) and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) associated with certain HLA-DRβ1* haplotype binding activities and characteristics, such as a 2-Å-distance difference between amino acids fitting into HLA-DRp1 Pockets 1 to 9, residues participating in binding to HLA-DR pockets and residues making contact with the TCR, suggesting haplotyp and allele-conscious TCR. This has been demonstrated in HLA-DR-like genotyped monkeys and provides the basis for designing high effective, subunit-based, multi-antigen, multi-stage, synthetic vaccines, for immediate human use, malaria being one of them. © 2007 The Authors.
Idioma originalEnglish (US)
Páginas (desde-hasta)1915-1935
Número de páginas21
PublicaciónJournal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine
Volumen12
N.º5B
DOI
EstadoPublished - oct 1 2008

Huella dactilar

Malaria Vaccines
Antimalarials
Epitopes
HLA-DR Antigens
Peptides
Haplorhini
Erythrocytes
Alleles
Synthetic Vaccines
Plasmodium falciparum
Circular Dichroism
Haplotypes
Malaria
Parasites
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Antigens
Amino Acids
Proteins

Citar esto

@article{e9ecf81e25134af2bfee5dc47a6a576d,
title = "Strategies for developing multi-epitope, subunit-based, chemically synthesized anti-malarial vaccines",
abstract = "An anti-malarial vaccine against the extremely lethal Plasmodium falciparum is desperately needed. Peptides from this parasite's proteins involved in invasion and having high red blood cell-binding ability were identified; these conserved peptides were not immun genic or protection-inducing when used for immunizing Aotus monkeys. Modifying some critical binding residues in these high-activi binding peptides' (HABPs') attachment to red blood cells (RBC) allowed them to induce immunogenicity and protection against expermental challenge and acquire the ability to bind to specific HLA-DRp1* alleles. These modified HABPs adopted certain characterist structural configurations as determined by circular dichroism (CD) and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) associated with certain HLA-DRβ1* haplotype binding activities and characteristics, such as a 2-{\AA}-distance difference between amino acids fitting into HLA-DRp1 Pockets 1 to 9, residues participating in binding to HLA-DR pockets and residues making contact with the TCR, suggesting haplotyp and allele-conscious TCR. This has been demonstrated in HLA-DR-like genotyped monkeys and provides the basis for designing high effective, subunit-based, multi-antigen, multi-stage, synthetic vaccines, for immediate human use, malaria being one of them. {\circledC} 2007 The Authors.",
author = "Patarroyo, {M. E.} and G. Cifuentes and A. Berm{\'u}dez and Patarroyo, {M. A.}",
year = "2008",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1582-4934.2008.00174.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "1915--1935",
journal = "Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine",
issn = "1582-1838",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "5B",

}

Strategies for developing multi-epitope, subunit-based, chemically synthesized anti-malarial vaccines. / Patarroyo, M. E.; Cifuentes, G.; Bermúdez, A.; Patarroyo, M. A.

En: Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Vol. 12, N.º 5B, 01.10.2008, p. 1915-1935.

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

TY - JOUR

T1 - Strategies for developing multi-epitope, subunit-based, chemically synthesized anti-malarial vaccines

AU - Patarroyo, M. E.

AU - Cifuentes, G.

AU - Bermúdez, A.

AU - Patarroyo, M. A.

PY - 2008/10/1

Y1 - 2008/10/1

N2 - An anti-malarial vaccine against the extremely lethal Plasmodium falciparum is desperately needed. Peptides from this parasite's proteins involved in invasion and having high red blood cell-binding ability were identified; these conserved peptides were not immun genic or protection-inducing when used for immunizing Aotus monkeys. Modifying some critical binding residues in these high-activi binding peptides' (HABPs') attachment to red blood cells (RBC) allowed them to induce immunogenicity and protection against expermental challenge and acquire the ability to bind to specific HLA-DRp1* alleles. These modified HABPs adopted certain characterist structural configurations as determined by circular dichroism (CD) and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) associated with certain HLA-DRβ1* haplotype binding activities and characteristics, such as a 2-Å-distance difference between amino acids fitting into HLA-DRp1 Pockets 1 to 9, residues participating in binding to HLA-DR pockets and residues making contact with the TCR, suggesting haplotyp and allele-conscious TCR. This has been demonstrated in HLA-DR-like genotyped monkeys and provides the basis for designing high effective, subunit-based, multi-antigen, multi-stage, synthetic vaccines, for immediate human use, malaria being one of them. © 2007 The Authors.

AB - An anti-malarial vaccine against the extremely lethal Plasmodium falciparum is desperately needed. Peptides from this parasite's proteins involved in invasion and having high red blood cell-binding ability were identified; these conserved peptides were not immun genic or protection-inducing when used for immunizing Aotus monkeys. Modifying some critical binding residues in these high-activi binding peptides' (HABPs') attachment to red blood cells (RBC) allowed them to induce immunogenicity and protection against expermental challenge and acquire the ability to bind to specific HLA-DRp1* alleles. These modified HABPs adopted certain characterist structural configurations as determined by circular dichroism (CD) and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) associated with certain HLA-DRβ1* haplotype binding activities and characteristics, such as a 2-Å-distance difference between amino acids fitting into HLA-DRp1 Pockets 1 to 9, residues participating in binding to HLA-DR pockets and residues making contact with the TCR, suggesting haplotyp and allele-conscious TCR. This has been demonstrated in HLA-DR-like genotyped monkeys and provides the basis for designing high effective, subunit-based, multi-antigen, multi-stage, synthetic vaccines, for immediate human use, malaria being one of them. © 2007 The Authors.

U2 - 10.1111/j.1582-4934.2008.00174.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1582-4934.2008.00174.x

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 1915

EP - 1935

JO - Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine

JF - Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine

SN - 1582-1838

IS - 5B

ER -