Recombination rate variation shapes barriers to introgression across butterfly genomes

Simon H. Martin, John W. Davey, Camilo Salazar, Chris D. Jiggins

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

2 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Hybridisation and introgression can dramatically alter the relationships among groups of species, leading to phylogenetic discordance across the genome and between populations. Introgression can also erode species differences over time, but selection against introgression at certain loci acts to maintain postmating species barriers. Theory predicts that species barriers made up of many loci throughout the genome should lead to a broad correlation between introgression and recombination rate, which determines the extent to which selection on deleterious foreign alleles will affect neutral alleles at physically linked loci. Here, we describe the variation in genealogical relationships across the genome among three species of Heliconius butterflies: H. melpomene (mel), H. cydno (cyd), and H. timareta (tim), using whole genomes of 92 individuals, and ask whether this variation can be explained by heterogeneous barriers to introgression. We find that species relationships vary predictably at the chromosomal scale. By quantifying recombination rate and admixture proportions, we then show that rates of introgression are predicted by variation in recombination rate. This implies that species barriers are highly polygenic, with selection acting against introgressed alleles across most of the genome. In addition, long chromosomes, which have lower recombination rates, produce stronger barriers on average than short chromosomes. Finally, we find a consistent difference between two species pairs on either side of the Andes, which suggests differences in the architecture of the species barriers. Our findings illustrate how the combined effects of hybridisation, recombination, and natural selection, acting at multitudes of loci over long periods, can dramatically sculpt the phylogenetic relationships among species.

Idioma originalEnglish (US)
Número de artículoe2006288
PublicaciónPLoS Biology
Volumen17
N.º2
DOI
EstadoPublished - feb 1 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Citar esto

Martin, Simon H. ; Davey, John W. ; Salazar, Camilo ; Jiggins, Chris D. / Recombination rate variation shapes barriers to introgression across butterfly genomes. En: PLoS Biology. 2019 ; Vol. 17, N.º 2.
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Recombination rate variation shapes barriers to introgression across butterfly genomes. / Martin, Simon H.; Davey, John W.; Salazar, Camilo; Jiggins, Chris D.

En: PLoS Biology, Vol. 17, N.º 2, e2006288, 01.02.2019.

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

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