Phospholipid supplementation can attenuate vaccine-induced depressive-like behavior in mice

Shaye Kivity, Maria Teresa Arango, Nicolás Molano-González, Miri Blank, Yehuda Shoenfeld

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

6 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

© 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New YorkHuman papillomavirus vaccine (HPVv) is used worldwide for prevention of infection. However several reports link this vaccine, with immune-mediated reactions, especially with neurological manifestations. Our previous results showed that HPVv-Gardasil and aluminum-immunized mice developed behavioral impairments. Studies have shown a positive effect of phospholipid supplementation on depression and cognitive functions in mice. Therefore, our goal was to evaluate the effect of a dietary supplement on vaccine-induced depression. Sixty C57BL/6 female mice were immunized with HPVv-Gardasil, aluminum or the vehicle (n = 20 each group), and half of each group were fed 5 times per week with 0.2 ml of a dietary supplement enriched with phosphatidylcholine. The mice were evaluated for depression at 3 months of age, by the forced swimming test. Both the Gardasil and the aluminum-treated mice developed depressive-like behavior when compared to the control group. The HPVv-Gardasil-immunized mice supplemented with phosphatidylcholine significantly reduced their depressive symptoms. This study confirms our previous studies demonstrating depressive-like behavior in mice vaccinated with HPVv-Gardasil. In addition, it demonstrates the ability of phosphatidylcholine-enriched diet to attenuate depressive-like behavior in the HPVv-Gardasil-vaccinated mice. We suggest that phosphatidylcholine supplementation may serve as a treatment for patients suffering vaccine-related neurological manifestations.
Idioma originalEnglish (US)
Páginas (desde-hasta)1-7
Número de páginas7
PublicaciónImmunologic Research
DOI
EstadoPublished - jul 27 2016

Huella dactilar

Phospholipids
Vaccines
Phosphatidylcholines
Aluminum
Depression
Dietary Supplements
Neurologic Manifestations
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Aptitude
Cognition
Human Papillomavirus Recombinant Vaccine Quadrivalent, Types 6, 11, 16, 18
Diet
Control Groups
Infection

Citar esto

Kivity, Shaye ; Arango, Maria Teresa ; Molano-González, Nicolás ; Blank, Miri ; Shoenfeld, Yehuda. / Phospholipid supplementation can attenuate vaccine-induced depressive-like behavior in mice. En: Immunologic Research. 2016 ; pp. 1-7.
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Phospholipid supplementation can attenuate vaccine-induced depressive-like behavior in mice. / Kivity, Shaye; Arango, Maria Teresa; Molano-González, Nicolás; Blank, Miri; Shoenfeld, Yehuda.

En: Immunologic Research, 27.07.2016, p. 1-7.

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

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