Occupational exposures and mammographic density in Spanish women

Virginia Lope, Javier García-Pérez, Beatriz Pérez-Gómez, Ana María Pedraza-Flechas, Juan Alguacil, Mª Carmen González-Galarzo, Miguel Angel Alba, Rudolf van der Haar, Rosa Ana Cortés-Barragán, Carmen Pedraz-Pingarrón, Pilar Moreo, Carmen Santamariña, María Ederra, Carmen Vidal, Dolores Salas-Trejo, Carmen Sánchez-Contador, Rafael Llobet, Marina Pollán

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

2 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

OBJECTIVES: The association between occupational exposures and mammographic density (MD), a marker of breast cancer risk, has not been previously explored. Our objective was to investigate the influence of occupational exposure to chemical, physical and microbiological agents on MD in adult women.

METHODS: This is a population-based cross-sectional study based on 1476 female workers aged 45-65 years from seven Spanish breast cancer screening programmes. Occupational history was surveyed by trained staff. Exposure to occupational agents was assessed using the Spanish job-exposure matrix MatEmESp. Percentage of MD was measured by two radiologists using a semiautomatic computer tool. The association was estimated using mixed log-linear regression models adjusting for age, education, body mass index, menopausal status, parity, smoking, alcohol intake, type of mammography, family history of breast cancer and hormonal therapy use, and including screening centre and professional reader as random effects terms.

RESULTS: Although no association was found with most of the agents, women occupationally exposed to perchloroethylene (eβ=1.51; 95% CI 1.04 to 2.19), ionising radiation (eβ=1.23; 95% CI 0.99 to 1.52) and mould spores (eβ=1.44; 95% CI 1.01 to 2.04) tended to have higher MD. The percentage of density increased 12% for every 5 years exposure to perchloroethylene or mould spores, 11% for every 5 years exposure to aliphatic/alicyclic hydrocarbon solvents and 3% for each 5 years exposure to ionising radiation.

CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to perchloroethylene, ionising radiation, mould spores or aliphatic/alicyclic hydrocarbon solvents in occupational settings could be associated with higher MD. Further studies are needed to clarify the accuracy and the reasons for these findings.

Idioma originalEnglish (US)
Páginas (desde-hasta)124-131
Número de páginas8
PublicaciónOccupational and Environmental Medicine
Volumen75
N.º2
DOI
EstadoPublished - feb 2018

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Lope, V., García-Pérez, J., Pérez-Gómez, B., Pedraza-Flechas, A. M., Alguacil, J., González-Galarzo, M. C., ... Pollán, M. (2018). Occupational exposures and mammographic density in Spanish women. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 75(2), 124-131. https://doi.org/10.1136/oemed-2017-104580
Lope, Virginia ; García-Pérez, Javier ; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz ; Pedraza-Flechas, Ana María ; Alguacil, Juan ; González-Galarzo, Mª Carmen ; Alba, Miguel Angel ; van der Haar, Rudolf ; Cortés-Barragán, Rosa Ana ; Pedraz-Pingarrón, Carmen ; Moreo, Pilar ; Santamariña, Carmen ; Ederra, María ; Vidal, Carmen ; Salas-Trejo, Dolores ; Sánchez-Contador, Carmen ; Llobet, Rafael ; Pollán, Marina. / Occupational exposures and mammographic density in Spanish women. En: Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 75, N.º 2. pp. 124-131.
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title = "Occupational exposures and mammographic density in Spanish women",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: The association between occupational exposures and mammographic density (MD), a marker of breast cancer risk, has not been previously explored. Our objective was to investigate the influence of occupational exposure to chemical, physical and microbiological agents on MD in adult women.METHODS: This is a population-based cross-sectional study based on 1476 female workers aged 45-65 years from seven Spanish breast cancer screening programmes. Occupational history was surveyed by trained staff. Exposure to occupational agents was assessed using the Spanish job-exposure matrix MatEmESp. Percentage of MD was measured by two radiologists using a semiautomatic computer tool. The association was estimated using mixed log-linear regression models adjusting for age, education, body mass index, menopausal status, parity, smoking, alcohol intake, type of mammography, family history of breast cancer and hormonal therapy use, and including screening centre and professional reader as random effects terms.RESULTS: Although no association was found with most of the agents, women occupationally exposed to perchloroethylene (eβ=1.51; 95{\%} CI 1.04 to 2.19), ionising radiation (eβ=1.23; 95{\%} CI 0.99 to 1.52) and mould spores (eβ=1.44; 95{\%} CI 1.01 to 2.04) tended to have higher MD. The percentage of density increased 12{\%} for every 5 years exposure to perchloroethylene or mould spores, 11{\%} for every 5 years exposure to aliphatic/alicyclic hydrocarbon solvents and 3{\%} for each 5 years exposure to ionising radiation.CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to perchloroethylene, ionising radiation, mould spores or aliphatic/alicyclic hydrocarbon solvents in occupational settings could be associated with higher MD. Further studies are needed to clarify the accuracy and the reasons for these findings.",
author = "Virginia Lope and Javier Garc{\'i}a-P{\'e}rez and Beatriz P{\'e}rez-G{\'o}mez and Pedraza-Flechas, {Ana Mar{\'i}a} and Juan Alguacil and Gonz{\'a}lez-Galarzo, {Mª Carmen} and Alba, {Miguel Angel} and {van der Haar}, Rudolf and Cort{\'e}s-Barrag{\'a}n, {Rosa Ana} and Carmen Pedraz-Pingarr{\'o}n and Pilar Moreo and Carmen Santamari{\~n}a and Mar{\'i}a Ederra and Carmen Vidal and Dolores Salas-Trejo and Carmen S{\'a}nchez-Contador and Rafael Llobet and Marina Poll{\'a}n",
note = "{\circledC} Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1136/oemed-2017-104580",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "75",
pages = "124--131",
journal = "Occupational and Environmental Medicine",
issn = "1351-0711",
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Lope, V, García-Pérez, J, Pérez-Gómez, B, Pedraza-Flechas, AM, Alguacil, J, González-Galarzo, MC, Alba, MA, van der Haar, R, Cortés-Barragán, RA, Pedraz-Pingarrón, C, Moreo, P, Santamariña, C, Ederra, M, Vidal, C, Salas-Trejo, D, Sánchez-Contador, C, Llobet, R & Pollán, M 2018, 'Occupational exposures and mammographic density in Spanish women', Occupational and Environmental Medicine, vol. 75, n.º 2, pp. 124-131. https://doi.org/10.1136/oemed-2017-104580

Occupational exposures and mammographic density in Spanish women. / Lope, Virginia; García-Pérez, Javier; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Pedraza-Flechas, Ana María; Alguacil, Juan; González-Galarzo, Mª Carmen; Alba, Miguel Angel; van der Haar, Rudolf; Cortés-Barragán, Rosa Ana; Pedraz-Pingarrón, Carmen; Moreo, Pilar; Santamariña, Carmen; Ederra, María; Vidal, Carmen; Salas-Trejo, Dolores; Sánchez-Contador, Carmen; Llobet, Rafael; Pollán, Marina.

En: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 75, N.º 2, 02.2018, p. 124-131.

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

TY - JOUR

T1 - Occupational exposures and mammographic density in Spanish women

AU - Lope, Virginia

AU - García-Pérez, Javier

AU - Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz

AU - Pedraza-Flechas, Ana María

AU - Alguacil, Juan

AU - González-Galarzo, Mª Carmen

AU - Alba, Miguel Angel

AU - van der Haar, Rudolf

AU - Cortés-Barragán, Rosa Ana

AU - Pedraz-Pingarrón, Carmen

AU - Moreo, Pilar

AU - Santamariña, Carmen

AU - Ederra, María

AU - Vidal, Carmen

AU - Salas-Trejo, Dolores

AU - Sánchez-Contador, Carmen

AU - Llobet, Rafael

AU - Pollán, Marina

N1 - © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

PY - 2018/2

Y1 - 2018/2

N2 - OBJECTIVES: The association between occupational exposures and mammographic density (MD), a marker of breast cancer risk, has not been previously explored. Our objective was to investigate the influence of occupational exposure to chemical, physical and microbiological agents on MD in adult women.METHODS: This is a population-based cross-sectional study based on 1476 female workers aged 45-65 years from seven Spanish breast cancer screening programmes. Occupational history was surveyed by trained staff. Exposure to occupational agents was assessed using the Spanish job-exposure matrix MatEmESp. Percentage of MD was measured by two radiologists using a semiautomatic computer tool. The association was estimated using mixed log-linear regression models adjusting for age, education, body mass index, menopausal status, parity, smoking, alcohol intake, type of mammography, family history of breast cancer and hormonal therapy use, and including screening centre and professional reader as random effects terms.RESULTS: Although no association was found with most of the agents, women occupationally exposed to perchloroethylene (eβ=1.51; 95% CI 1.04 to 2.19), ionising radiation (eβ=1.23; 95% CI 0.99 to 1.52) and mould spores (eβ=1.44; 95% CI 1.01 to 2.04) tended to have higher MD. The percentage of density increased 12% for every 5 years exposure to perchloroethylene or mould spores, 11% for every 5 years exposure to aliphatic/alicyclic hydrocarbon solvents and 3% for each 5 years exposure to ionising radiation.CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to perchloroethylene, ionising radiation, mould spores or aliphatic/alicyclic hydrocarbon solvents in occupational settings could be associated with higher MD. Further studies are needed to clarify the accuracy and the reasons for these findings.

AB - OBJECTIVES: The association between occupational exposures and mammographic density (MD), a marker of breast cancer risk, has not been previously explored. Our objective was to investigate the influence of occupational exposure to chemical, physical and microbiological agents on MD in adult women.METHODS: This is a population-based cross-sectional study based on 1476 female workers aged 45-65 years from seven Spanish breast cancer screening programmes. Occupational history was surveyed by trained staff. Exposure to occupational agents was assessed using the Spanish job-exposure matrix MatEmESp. Percentage of MD was measured by two radiologists using a semiautomatic computer tool. The association was estimated using mixed log-linear regression models adjusting for age, education, body mass index, menopausal status, parity, smoking, alcohol intake, type of mammography, family history of breast cancer and hormonal therapy use, and including screening centre and professional reader as random effects terms.RESULTS: Although no association was found with most of the agents, women occupationally exposed to perchloroethylene (eβ=1.51; 95% CI 1.04 to 2.19), ionising radiation (eβ=1.23; 95% CI 0.99 to 1.52) and mould spores (eβ=1.44; 95% CI 1.01 to 2.04) tended to have higher MD. The percentage of density increased 12% for every 5 years exposure to perchloroethylene or mould spores, 11% for every 5 years exposure to aliphatic/alicyclic hydrocarbon solvents and 3% for each 5 years exposure to ionising radiation.CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to perchloroethylene, ionising radiation, mould spores or aliphatic/alicyclic hydrocarbon solvents in occupational settings could be associated with higher MD. Further studies are needed to clarify the accuracy and the reasons for these findings.

U2 - 10.1136/oemed-2017-104580

DO - 10.1136/oemed-2017-104580

M3 - Article

C2 - 29074552

VL - 75

SP - 124

EP - 131

JO - Occupational and Environmental Medicine

JF - Occupational and Environmental Medicine

SN - 1351-0711

IS - 2

ER -

Lope V, García-Pérez J, Pérez-Gómez B, Pedraza-Flechas AM, Alguacil J, González-Galarzo MC y otros. Occupational exposures and mammographic density in Spanish women. Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2018 feb;75(2):124-131. https://doi.org/10.1136/oemed-2017-104580