Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv LpqG protein peptides can inhibit mycobacterial entry through specific interactions

Christian David Sánchez-Barinas, Marisol Ocampo, Magnolia Vanegas, Jeimmy Johana Castañeda-Ramirez, Manuel Alfonso Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin Patarroyo

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

1 Cita (Scopus)

Resumen

Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causative agent of tuberculosis, a disease causing major mortality worldwide. As part of a systematic methodology for studying M. tuberculosis surface proteins which might be involved in host-pathogen interactions, our group found that LpqG surface protein (Rv3623) found in M. tuberculosis complex strains was located on the mycobacterial envelope and that peptide 16661 (21SGCDSHNSGSLGADPRQVTVY40) had high specific binding to U937 monocyte-derived macrophages and inhibited mycobacterial entry to such cells in a concentration-dependent way. A region having high specific binding to A549 alveolar epithelial cells was found which had low mycobacterial entry inhibition. As suggested in previous studies, relevant sequences in the host-pathogen interaction do not induce an immune response and peptides characterised as HABPs are poorly recognised by sera from individuals regardless of whether they have been in contact with M. tuberculosis. Our approach to designing a synthetic, multi-epitope anti-tuberculosis vaccine has been based on identifying sequences involved in different proteins' mycobacteria-target cell interaction and modifying their sequence to improve their immunogenic characteristics, meaning that peptide 16661 sequence should be considered in such design.

Idioma originalEnglish (US)
Número de artículo526
PublicaciónMolecules
Volumen23
N.º3
DOI
EstadoPublished - ene 1 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Chemistry (miscellaneous)
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Drug Discovery
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry

Citar esto

Sánchez-Barinas, Christian David ; Ocampo, Marisol ; Vanegas, Magnolia ; Castañeda-Ramirez, Jeimmy Johana ; Patarroyo, Manuel Alfonso ; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin. / Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv LpqG protein peptides can inhibit mycobacterial entry through specific interactions. En: Molecules. 2018 ; Vol. 23, N.º 3.
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Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv LpqG protein peptides can inhibit mycobacterial entry through specific interactions. / Sánchez-Barinas, Christian David; Ocampo, Marisol; Vanegas, Magnolia; Castañeda-Ramirez, Jeimmy Johana; Patarroyo, Manuel Alfonso; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin.

En: Molecules, Vol. 23, N.º 3, 526, 01.01.2018.

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

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