Labour migration and social networks participation in southern Mozambique

Juan M. Gallego, Mariapia Mendola

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

8 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

This paper investigates how social networks in poor developing settings are affected by migration. Using a unique household survey from southern Mozambique, we test the role of labour mobility in shaping participation in groups and interhousehold cooperation by migrant-sending households in village economies at origin. We find that migration cum remittances boosts household engagement in community-based social networks. Our findings are robust to alternative definitions of social interaction and to endogeneity concerns, suggesting that stable migration ties and higher income stability through remittances may decrease participation constraints and increase household commitment in cooperative arrangements in migrant-sending communities. © 2013 The London School of Economics and Political Science.
Idioma originalEnglish (US)
Páginas (desde-hasta)721-759
Número de páginas39
PublicaciónEconomica
DOI
EstadoPublished - ene 1 2013

Huella dactilar

Mozambique
Household
Participation
Labour migration
Social networks
Migrants
Remittances
Income
Economics
Labour mobility
Participation constraints
Endogeneity
Household survey
Community-based
Social interaction
Political Science

Citar esto

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abstract = "This paper investigates how social networks in poor developing settings are affected by migration. Using a unique household survey from southern Mozambique, we test the role of labour mobility in shaping participation in groups and interhousehold cooperation by migrant-sending households in village economies at origin. We find that migration cum remittances boosts household engagement in community-based social networks. Our findings are robust to alternative definitions of social interaction and to endogeneity concerns, suggesting that stable migration ties and higher income stability through remittances may decrease participation constraints and increase household commitment in cooperative arrangements in migrant-sending communities. {\circledC} 2013 The London School of Economics and Political Science.",
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Labour migration and social networks participation in southern Mozambique. / Gallego, Juan M.; Mendola, Mariapia.

En: Economica, 01.01.2013, p. 721-759.

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

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