Introducing polyautoimmunity: Secondary autoimmune diseases no longer exist

Adriana Rojas-Villarraga, Jenny Amaya-Amaya, Alberto Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Rubén D. Mantilla, Juan Manuel Anaya

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaRevisión Literaria

78 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Similar pathophysiological mechanisms within autoimmune diseases have stimulated searches for common genetic roots. Polyautoimmunity is defined as the presence of more than one autoimmune disease in a single patient. When three or more autoimmune diseases coexist, this condition is called multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS). We analyzed the presence of polyautoimmunity in 1,083 patients belonging to four autoimmune disease cohorts. Polyautoimmunity was observed in 373 patients (34.4). Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and Sjgren's syndrome (SS) were the most frequent diseases encountered. Factors significantly associated with polyautoimmunity were female gender and familial autoimmunity. Through a systematic literature review, an updated search was done for all MAS cases (January 2006September 2011). There were 142 articles retrieved corresponding to 226 cases. Next, we performed a clustering analysis in which AITD followed by systemic lupus erythematosus and SS were the most hierarchical diseases encountered. Our results indicate that coexistence of autoimmune diseases is not uncommon and follows a grouping pattern. Polyautoimmunity is the term proposed for this association of disorders, which encompasses the concept of a common origin for these diseases. © 2012 Adriana Rojas-Villarraga et al.
Idioma originalEnglish (US)
PublicaciónAutoimmune Diseases
DOI
EstadoPublished - abr 3 2012

Huella dactilar

Autoimmune Diseases
Thyroid Diseases
Autoimmunity
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Cluster Analysis

Citar esto

Rojas-Villarraga, A., Amaya-Amaya, J., Rodriguez-Rodriguez, A., Mantilla, R. D., & Anaya, J. M. (2012). Introducing polyautoimmunity: Secondary autoimmune diseases no longer exist. Autoimmune Diseases. https://doi.org/10.1155/2012/254319
Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana ; Amaya-Amaya, Jenny ; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Alberto ; Mantilla, Rubén D. ; Anaya, Juan Manuel. / Introducing polyautoimmunity: Secondary autoimmune diseases no longer exist. En: Autoimmune Diseases. 2012.
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Rojas-Villarraga, A, Amaya-Amaya, J, Rodriguez-Rodriguez, A, Mantilla, RD & Anaya, JM 2012, 'Introducing polyautoimmunity: Secondary autoimmune diseases no longer exist', Autoimmune Diseases. https://doi.org/10.1155/2012/254319

Introducing polyautoimmunity: Secondary autoimmune diseases no longer exist. / Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Amaya-Amaya, Jenny; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Alberto; Mantilla, Rubén D.; Anaya, Juan Manuel.

En: Autoimmune Diseases, 03.04.2012.

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaRevisión Literaria

TY - JOUR

T1 - Introducing polyautoimmunity: Secondary autoimmune diseases no longer exist

AU - Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

AU - Amaya-Amaya, Jenny

AU - Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Alberto

AU - Mantilla, Rubén D.

AU - Anaya, Juan Manuel

PY - 2012/4/3

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N2 - Similar pathophysiological mechanisms within autoimmune diseases have stimulated searches for common genetic roots. Polyautoimmunity is defined as the presence of more than one autoimmune disease in a single patient. When three or more autoimmune diseases coexist, this condition is called multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS). We analyzed the presence of polyautoimmunity in 1,083 patients belonging to four autoimmune disease cohorts. Polyautoimmunity was observed in 373 patients (34.4). Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and Sjgren's syndrome (SS) were the most frequent diseases encountered. Factors significantly associated with polyautoimmunity were female gender and familial autoimmunity. Through a systematic literature review, an updated search was done for all MAS cases (January 2006September 2011). There were 142 articles retrieved corresponding to 226 cases. Next, we performed a clustering analysis in which AITD followed by systemic lupus erythematosus and SS were the most hierarchical diseases encountered. Our results indicate that coexistence of autoimmune diseases is not uncommon and follows a grouping pattern. Polyautoimmunity is the term proposed for this association of disorders, which encompasses the concept of a common origin for these diseases. © 2012 Adriana Rojas-Villarraga et al.

AB - Similar pathophysiological mechanisms within autoimmune diseases have stimulated searches for common genetic roots. Polyautoimmunity is defined as the presence of more than one autoimmune disease in a single patient. When three or more autoimmune diseases coexist, this condition is called multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS). We analyzed the presence of polyautoimmunity in 1,083 patients belonging to four autoimmune disease cohorts. Polyautoimmunity was observed in 373 patients (34.4). Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and Sjgren's syndrome (SS) were the most frequent diseases encountered. Factors significantly associated with polyautoimmunity were female gender and familial autoimmunity. Through a systematic literature review, an updated search was done for all MAS cases (January 2006September 2011). There were 142 articles retrieved corresponding to 226 cases. Next, we performed a clustering analysis in which AITD followed by systemic lupus erythematosus and SS were the most hierarchical diseases encountered. Our results indicate that coexistence of autoimmune diseases is not uncommon and follows a grouping pattern. Polyautoimmunity is the term proposed for this association of disorders, which encompasses the concept of a common origin for these diseases. © 2012 Adriana Rojas-Villarraga et al.

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Rojas-Villarraga A, Amaya-Amaya J, Rodriguez-Rodriguez A, Mantilla RD, Anaya JM. Introducing polyautoimmunity: Secondary autoimmune diseases no longer exist. Autoimmune Diseases. 2012 abr 3. https://doi.org/10.1155/2012/254319