How do our students learn clinical engineering? A pilot study

Antonio Miguel Cruz, Daniel Alejandro Quiroga Torres, Ana Maria Presiga, Nestor Flórez Luna

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a libro /Tipo informe o reporteContribución en conferencia

Resumen

This paper aims to measure what are the students’ perceived learning outcome achievements after finishing their clinical engineering major courses. This is a pre- post-test with no control group study design. Forty students were involved in this pilot study. A paper-based survey composed of a demographic section and a 5-point Likert (“1” is strongly disagree and “5” is strongly agree) section measured the students’ perceived learning outcome achievements after exposing them to clinical engineering major courses. A Wilcoxon signed-rank and Mann-Whitney U test statistics were conducted to test the two hypotheses of this study. Our analysis showed statistically significant results between the pre-survey mean and SD: 21.10 SD 3.54; and between the postsurvey mean and SD: 22.75 SD 3.68 (Z=-2.12, p<0.033), indicating that overall, students’ perceived learning outcome achievements after exposing them to clinical engineering major courses had significantly improved by the end of the major. Also, statistically significant results were found between the post-survey mean and SD: 3.94 SD 0.61 learning outcome perceptions and between the students’ actual marks mean and SD: 4.53 SD 0.22 (-5.00, p<0.000), indicating the students had low confidence in their learning outcomes after completing their clinical engineering major.

Idioma originalEnglish (US)
Título de la publicación alojada7th Latin American Congress on Biomedical Engineering, CLAIB 2016
EditorialSpringer
Páginas22-25
Número de páginas4
Volumen60
ISBN (versión impresa)9789811040856
DOI
EstadoPublished - 2017
Evento7th Latin American Congress on Biomedical Engineering, CLAIB 2016 - Bucaramanga, Santander
Duración: oct 26 2016oct 28 2016

Conference

Conference7th Latin American Congress on Biomedical Engineering, CLAIB 2016
PaísColombia
CiudadBucaramanga, Santander
Período10/26/1610/28/16

Huella dactilar

Students
Statistics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Bioengineering

Citar esto

Cruz, A. M., Torres, D. A. Q., Presiga, A. M., & Luna, N. F. (2017). How do our students learn clinical engineering? A pilot study. En 7th Latin American Congress on Biomedical Engineering, CLAIB 2016 (Vol. 60, pp. 22-25). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-4086-3_6
Cruz, Antonio Miguel ; Torres, Daniel Alejandro Quiroga ; Presiga, Ana Maria ; Luna, Nestor Flórez. / How do our students learn clinical engineering? A pilot study. 7th Latin American Congress on Biomedical Engineering, CLAIB 2016. Vol. 60 Springer, 2017. pp. 22-25
@inproceedings{3c750f7abb6f4d6a927fc5103ec17e0d,
title = "How do our students learn clinical engineering? A pilot study",
abstract = "This paper aims to measure what are the students’ perceived learning outcome achievements after finishing their clinical engineering major courses. This is a pre- post-test with no control group study design. Forty students were involved in this pilot study. A paper-based survey composed of a demographic section and a 5-point Likert (“1” is strongly disagree and “5” is strongly agree) section measured the students’ perceived learning outcome achievements after exposing them to clinical engineering major courses. A Wilcoxon signed-rank and Mann-Whitney U test statistics were conducted to test the two hypotheses of this study. Our analysis showed statistically significant results between the pre-survey mean and SD: 21.10 SD 3.54; and between the postsurvey mean and SD: 22.75 SD 3.68 (Z=-2.12, p<0.033), indicating that overall, students’ perceived learning outcome achievements after exposing them to clinical engineering major courses had significantly improved by the end of the major. Also, statistically significant results were found between the post-survey mean and SD: 3.94 SD 0.61 learning outcome perceptions and between the students’ actual marks mean and SD: 4.53 SD 0.22 (-5.00, p<0.000), indicating the students had low confidence in their learning outcomes after completing their clinical engineering major.",
author = "Cruz, {Antonio Miguel} and Torres, {Daniel Alejandro Quiroga} and Presiga, {Ana Maria} and Luna, {Nestor Fl{\'o}rez}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1007/978-981-10-4086-3_6",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9789811040856",
volume = "60",
pages = "22--25",
booktitle = "7th Latin American Congress on Biomedical Engineering, CLAIB 2016",
publisher = "Springer",
address = "Germany",

}

Cruz, AM, Torres, DAQ, Presiga, AM & Luna, NF 2017, How do our students learn clinical engineering? A pilot study. En 7th Latin American Congress on Biomedical Engineering, CLAIB 2016. vol. 60, Springer, pp. 22-25, Bucaramanga, Santander, 10/26/16. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-4086-3_6

How do our students learn clinical engineering? A pilot study. / Cruz, Antonio Miguel; Torres, Daniel Alejandro Quiroga; Presiga, Ana Maria; Luna, Nestor Flórez.

7th Latin American Congress on Biomedical Engineering, CLAIB 2016. Vol. 60 Springer, 2017. p. 22-25.

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a libro /Tipo informe o reporteContribución en conferencia

TY - GEN

T1 - How do our students learn clinical engineering? A pilot study

AU - Cruz, Antonio Miguel

AU - Torres, Daniel Alejandro Quiroga

AU - Presiga, Ana Maria

AU - Luna, Nestor Flórez

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - This paper aims to measure what are the students’ perceived learning outcome achievements after finishing their clinical engineering major courses. This is a pre- post-test with no control group study design. Forty students were involved in this pilot study. A paper-based survey composed of a demographic section and a 5-point Likert (“1” is strongly disagree and “5” is strongly agree) section measured the students’ perceived learning outcome achievements after exposing them to clinical engineering major courses. A Wilcoxon signed-rank and Mann-Whitney U test statistics were conducted to test the two hypotheses of this study. Our analysis showed statistically significant results between the pre-survey mean and SD: 21.10 SD 3.54; and between the postsurvey mean and SD: 22.75 SD 3.68 (Z=-2.12, p<0.033), indicating that overall, students’ perceived learning outcome achievements after exposing them to clinical engineering major courses had significantly improved by the end of the major. Also, statistically significant results were found between the post-survey mean and SD: 3.94 SD 0.61 learning outcome perceptions and between the students’ actual marks mean and SD: 4.53 SD 0.22 (-5.00, p<0.000), indicating the students had low confidence in their learning outcomes after completing their clinical engineering major.

AB - This paper aims to measure what are the students’ perceived learning outcome achievements after finishing their clinical engineering major courses. This is a pre- post-test with no control group study design. Forty students were involved in this pilot study. A paper-based survey composed of a demographic section and a 5-point Likert (“1” is strongly disagree and “5” is strongly agree) section measured the students’ perceived learning outcome achievements after exposing them to clinical engineering major courses. A Wilcoxon signed-rank and Mann-Whitney U test statistics were conducted to test the two hypotheses of this study. Our analysis showed statistically significant results between the pre-survey mean and SD: 21.10 SD 3.54; and between the postsurvey mean and SD: 22.75 SD 3.68 (Z=-2.12, p<0.033), indicating that overall, students’ perceived learning outcome achievements after exposing them to clinical engineering major courses had significantly improved by the end of the major. Also, statistically significant results were found between the post-survey mean and SD: 3.94 SD 0.61 learning outcome perceptions and between the students’ actual marks mean and SD: 4.53 SD 0.22 (-5.00, p<0.000), indicating the students had low confidence in their learning outcomes after completing their clinical engineering major.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85018427839&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85018427839&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/978-981-10-4086-3_6

DO - 10.1007/978-981-10-4086-3_6

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 9789811040856

VL - 60

SP - 22

EP - 25

BT - 7th Latin American Congress on Biomedical Engineering, CLAIB 2016

PB - Springer

ER -

Cruz AM, Torres DAQ, Presiga AM, Luna NF. How do our students learn clinical engineering? A pilot study. En 7th Latin American Congress on Biomedical Engineering, CLAIB 2016. Vol. 60. Springer. 2017. p. 22-25 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-4086-3_6