Functional, biochemical and 3D studies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein peptides for an effective anti-tuberculosis vaccine

Marisol Ocampo, Manuel A. Patarroyo, Magnolia Vanegas, Martha P. Alba, Manuel E. Patarroyo

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaRevisión Literaria

12 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Tuberculosis (TB) is an air-born, transmissible disease, having an estimated 9.4 million new TB cases worldwide in 2009. Eventual control of this disease by developing a safe and efficient new vaccine able to detain its spread will have an enormous impact on public health policy. Selecting potential antigens to be included in a multi-epitope, minimal subunit-based, chemically-synthesized vaccine containing the minimum sequences needed for blocking mycobacterial interaction with host cells is a complex task due to the multiple mechanisms involved in M. tuberculosis infection and the mycobacterium's immune evasion mechanisms. Our methodology, described here takes into account a highly robust, specific, sensitive and functional approach to the search for potential epitopes to be included in an anti-TB vaccine; it has been based on identifying short mycobacterial protein fragments using synthetic peptides having high affinity interaction with alveolar epithelial cells (A549) and monocyte-derived macrophages (U937) which are able to block the microorganism's entry to target cells in in vitro assays. This manuscript presents a review of the results obtained with some of the MTB H37Rv proteins studied to date, aimed at using these high activity binding peptides (HABPs) as platforms to be included in a minimal subunit-based, multiepitope, chemically-synthesized, antituberculosis vaccine. © 2014 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc. All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted.
Idioma originalEnglish (US)
Páginas (desde-hasta)117-145
Número de páginas29
PublicaciónCritical Reviews in Microbiology
DOI
EstadoPublished - may 1 2014

Huella dactilar

Tuberculosis Vaccines
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Vaccines
Peptides
Epitopes
Tuberculosis
Alveolar Epithelial Cells
Immune Evasion
Reproductive Rights
Mycobacterium Infections
Proteins
Public Policy
Mycobacterium
Health Policy
Public Health
Macrophages
Air
Antigens

Citar esto

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Functional, biochemical and 3D studies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein peptides for an effective anti-tuberculosis vaccine. / Ocampo, Marisol; Patarroyo, Manuel A.; Vanegas, Magnolia; Alba, Martha P.; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

En: Critical Reviews in Microbiology, 01.05.2014, p. 117-145.

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaRevisión Literaria

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