Experience in the surgical management of abdominal compartment syndrome in the Hospital Occidente de Kennedy

Alejandro Moscoso, Andrés Isaza, María Isabel Rizo, Darío Pinilla, Sandra Sánchez, Luz Marina Cubillos

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

Resumen

The abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is the result of various physiological alterations produced by an abnormal increase of the intra-abdominal pressure. Some of these patients will undergo a surgical procedure for its management. Methods: This is a retrospective case series of 28 patients with ACS who required surgical treatment at the Hospital Occidente de Kennedy between 1999 and 2003. We assessed retrospectively the behavior of McNelis's equation for prediction of the development of the ACS. Results: The leading cause of ACS in our study was intra-abadominal infection (n=6 21,4%). Time elapsed between diagnosis and surgical decompression was less than 4 hours in 75% (n=21) of the cases. The variables that improved significantly after the surgical decompression were CVP (T: 4,0 p: 0,0001), PIM (T:-2,7; p: 0,004), PIA (T1,8; p:0,034) and Urine Output (T:-2,4; p:0,02). The values of BUN, Creatinine and the cardiovascular instability did not show improvement. The ICU and hospital length of stay were 11 days (SD: 9) and 18 days (SD13) respectively. Global mortality was 67,9% (n=19) and mortality directly attributable to the syndrome was 30% (n=8). The behavior of the McNelis's equation was erratic. Condusions: The demographic characteristics as well as disease processes associated with ACS are consistent with the literature. The association between physiological variables and ACS is heterogeneous between patients. Mortality rates attributable to ACS in our institution are within the range described world-wide. The behavior of the McNelis's equation seems to depend greatly upon fluid balance.
Idioma originalEnglish (US)
Páginas (desde-hasta)33-42
Número de páginas10
PublicaciónRevista Ciencias de la Salud
EstadoPublished - ene 1 2007

Huella dactilar

Intra-Abdominal Hypertension
mortality
management
experience
Surgical Decompression
Mortality
Length of Stay
Disease
cause
Water-Electrolyte Balance
Blood Urea Nitrogen
Values
Creatinine
Demography
Urine
Pressure
Infection

Citar esto

Moscoso, Alejandro ; Isaza, Andrés ; Rizo, María Isabel ; Pinilla, Darío ; Sánchez, Sandra ; Cubillos, Luz Marina. / Experience in the surgical management of abdominal compartment syndrome in the Hospital Occidente de Kennedy. En: Revista Ciencias de la Salud. 2007 ; pp. 33-42.
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title = "Experience in the surgical management of abdominal compartment syndrome in the Hospital Occidente de Kennedy",
abstract = "The abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is the result of various physiological alterations produced by an abnormal increase of the intra-abdominal pressure. Some of these patients will undergo a surgical procedure for its management. Methods: This is a retrospective case series of 28 patients with ACS who required surgical treatment at the Hospital Occidente de Kennedy between 1999 and 2003. We assessed retrospectively the behavior of McNelis's equation for prediction of the development of the ACS. Results: The leading cause of ACS in our study was intra-abadominal infection (n=6 21,4{\%}). Time elapsed between diagnosis and surgical decompression was less than 4 hours in 75{\%} (n=21) of the cases. The variables that improved significantly after the surgical decompression were CVP (T: 4,0 p: 0,0001), PIM (T:-2,7; p: 0,004), PIA (T1,8; p:0,034) and Urine Output (T:-2,4; p:0,02). The values of BUN, Creatinine and the cardiovascular instability did not show improvement. The ICU and hospital length of stay were 11 days (SD: 9) and 18 days (SD13) respectively. Global mortality was 67,9{\%} (n=19) and mortality directly attributable to the syndrome was 30{\%} (n=8). The behavior of the McNelis's equation was erratic. Condusions: The demographic characteristics as well as disease processes associated with ACS are consistent with the literature. The association between physiological variables and ACS is heterogeneous between patients. Mortality rates attributable to ACS in our institution are within the range described world-wide. The behavior of the McNelis's equation seems to depend greatly upon fluid balance.",
author = "Alejandro Moscoso and Andr{\'e}s Isaza and Rizo, {Mar{\'i}a Isabel} and Dar{\'i}o Pinilla and Sandra S{\'a}nchez and Cubillos, {Luz Marina}",
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Experience in the surgical management of abdominal compartment syndrome in the Hospital Occidente de Kennedy. / Moscoso, Alejandro; Isaza, Andrés; Rizo, María Isabel; Pinilla, Darío; Sánchez, Sandra; Cubillos, Luz Marina.

En: Revista Ciencias de la Salud, 01.01.2007, p. 33-42.

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

TY - JOUR

T1 - Experience in the surgical management of abdominal compartment syndrome in the Hospital Occidente de Kennedy

AU - Moscoso, Alejandro

AU - Isaza, Andrés

AU - Rizo, María Isabel

AU - Pinilla, Darío

AU - Sánchez, Sandra

AU - Cubillos, Luz Marina

PY - 2007/1/1

Y1 - 2007/1/1

N2 - The abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is the result of various physiological alterations produced by an abnormal increase of the intra-abdominal pressure. Some of these patients will undergo a surgical procedure for its management. Methods: This is a retrospective case series of 28 patients with ACS who required surgical treatment at the Hospital Occidente de Kennedy between 1999 and 2003. We assessed retrospectively the behavior of McNelis's equation for prediction of the development of the ACS. Results: The leading cause of ACS in our study was intra-abadominal infection (n=6 21,4%). Time elapsed between diagnosis and surgical decompression was less than 4 hours in 75% (n=21) of the cases. The variables that improved significantly after the surgical decompression were CVP (T: 4,0 p: 0,0001), PIM (T:-2,7; p: 0,004), PIA (T1,8; p:0,034) and Urine Output (T:-2,4; p:0,02). The values of BUN, Creatinine and the cardiovascular instability did not show improvement. The ICU and hospital length of stay were 11 days (SD: 9) and 18 days (SD13) respectively. Global mortality was 67,9% (n=19) and mortality directly attributable to the syndrome was 30% (n=8). The behavior of the McNelis's equation was erratic. Condusions: The demographic characteristics as well as disease processes associated with ACS are consistent with the literature. The association between physiological variables and ACS is heterogeneous between patients. Mortality rates attributable to ACS in our institution are within the range described world-wide. The behavior of the McNelis's equation seems to depend greatly upon fluid balance.

AB - The abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is the result of various physiological alterations produced by an abnormal increase of the intra-abdominal pressure. Some of these patients will undergo a surgical procedure for its management. Methods: This is a retrospective case series of 28 patients with ACS who required surgical treatment at the Hospital Occidente de Kennedy between 1999 and 2003. We assessed retrospectively the behavior of McNelis's equation for prediction of the development of the ACS. Results: The leading cause of ACS in our study was intra-abadominal infection (n=6 21,4%). Time elapsed between diagnosis and surgical decompression was less than 4 hours in 75% (n=21) of the cases. The variables that improved significantly after the surgical decompression were CVP (T: 4,0 p: 0,0001), PIM (T:-2,7; p: 0,004), PIA (T1,8; p:0,034) and Urine Output (T:-2,4; p:0,02). The values of BUN, Creatinine and the cardiovascular instability did not show improvement. The ICU and hospital length of stay were 11 days (SD: 9) and 18 days (SD13) respectively. Global mortality was 67,9% (n=19) and mortality directly attributable to the syndrome was 30% (n=8). The behavior of the McNelis's equation was erratic. Condusions: The demographic characteristics as well as disease processes associated with ACS are consistent with the literature. The association between physiological variables and ACS is heterogeneous between patients. Mortality rates attributable to ACS in our institution are within the range described world-wide. The behavior of the McNelis's equation seems to depend greatly upon fluid balance.

M3 - Article

SP - 33

EP - 42

JO - Revista Ciencias de la Salud

JF - Revista Ciencias de la Salud

SN - 1692-7273

ER -