Effects of supervised exercise on cancer-related fatigue in breast cancer survivors: a systematic review and meta-analysis

José Francisco Meneses-Echávez, Emilio González-Jiménez, Robinson Ramírez-Vélez

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

79 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is the most common and distressing symptom in breast cancer survivors. Approximately 40% to 80% of cancer patients undergoing active treatment suffer from CRF. Exercise improves overall quality of life and CRF; however, the specific effects of the training modalities are not well understood.METHODS: This study aimed to determine the pooled effects of supervised exercise interventions on CRF in breast cancer survivors. We searched PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, CENTRAL and CINAHL databases between December 2013 and January 2014 without language restrictions. Risk of bias and methodological quality were evaluated using the PEDro score. Pooled effects were calculated with a random-effects model according to the DerSimonian and Laird method. Heterogeneity was evaluated with the I (2) test.RESULTS: Nine high-quality studies (n = 1156) were finally included. Supervised aerobic exercise was statistically more effective than conventional care in improving CRF among breast cancer survivors (SMD = -0.51, 95%CI -0.81 to -0.21), with high statistical heterogeneity (P = 0.001; I (2)  = 75%). Similar effects were found for resistance training on CRF (SMD = -0.41, 95%CI -0.76 to -0.05; P = 0.02; I(2) = 64%). Meta-regression analysis revealed that exercise volume parameters are closely related with the effect estimates on CRF. Egger's test suggested moderate evidence of publication bias (P = 0.04).CONCLUSIONS: Supervised exercise reduces CRF and must be implemented in breast cancer rehabilitation settings. High-volume exercises are safe and effective in improving CRF and overall quality of life in women with breast cancer. Further research is encouraged.TRIAL REGISTRATION: CRD42014007223.
Idioma originalEnglish (US)
Páginas (desde-hasta)77
Número de páginas1
PublicaciónBMC Cancer
DOI
EstadoPublished - feb 21 2015
Publicado de forma externa

Huella dactilar

Fatigue
Survivors
Meta-Analysis
Exercise
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Quality of Life
Publication Bias
Second Primary Neoplasms
Resistance Training
PubMed
MEDLINE
Language
Rehabilitation
Regression Analysis
Databases
Research

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Meneses-Echávez, José Francisco ; González-Jiménez, Emilio ; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson. / Effects of supervised exercise on cancer-related fatigue in breast cancer survivors: a systematic review and meta-analysis. En: BMC Cancer. 2015 ; pp. 77.
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title = "Effects of supervised exercise on cancer-related fatigue in breast cancer survivors: a systematic review and meta-analysis",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is the most common and distressing symptom in breast cancer survivors. Approximately 40{\%} to 80{\%} of cancer patients undergoing active treatment suffer from CRF. Exercise improves overall quality of life and CRF; however, the specific effects of the training modalities are not well understood.METHODS: This study aimed to determine the pooled effects of supervised exercise interventions on CRF in breast cancer survivors. We searched PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, CENTRAL and CINAHL databases between December 2013 and January 2014 without language restrictions. Risk of bias and methodological quality were evaluated using the PEDro score. Pooled effects were calculated with a random-effects model according to the DerSimonian and Laird method. Heterogeneity was evaluated with the I (2) test.RESULTS: Nine high-quality studies (n = 1156) were finally included. Supervised aerobic exercise was statistically more effective than conventional care in improving CRF among breast cancer survivors (SMD = -0.51, 95{\%}CI -0.81 to -0.21), with high statistical heterogeneity (P = 0.001; I (2)  = 75{\%}). Similar effects were found for resistance training on CRF (SMD = -0.41, 95{\%}CI -0.76 to -0.05; P = 0.02; I(2) = 64{\%}). Meta-regression analysis revealed that exercise volume parameters are closely related with the effect estimates on CRF. Egger's test suggested moderate evidence of publication bias (P = 0.04).CONCLUSIONS: Supervised exercise reduces CRF and must be implemented in breast cancer rehabilitation settings. High-volume exercises are safe and effective in improving CRF and overall quality of life in women with breast cancer. Further research is encouraged.TRIAL REGISTRATION: CRD42014007223.",
author = "Meneses-Ech{\'a}vez, {Jos{\'e} Francisco} and Emilio Gonz{\'a}lez-Jim{\'e}nez and Robinson Ram{\'i}rez-V{\'e}lez",
year = "2015",
month = "2",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1186/s12885-015-1069-4",
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Effects of supervised exercise on cancer-related fatigue in breast cancer survivors: a systematic review and meta-analysis. / Meneses-Echávez, José Francisco; González-Jiménez, Emilio; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson.

En: BMC Cancer, 21.02.2015, p. 77.

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of supervised exercise on cancer-related fatigue in breast cancer survivors: a systematic review and meta-analysis

AU - Meneses-Echávez, José Francisco

AU - González-Jiménez, Emilio

AU - Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson

PY - 2015/2/21

Y1 - 2015/2/21

N2 - BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is the most common and distressing symptom in breast cancer survivors. Approximately 40% to 80% of cancer patients undergoing active treatment suffer from CRF. Exercise improves overall quality of life and CRF; however, the specific effects of the training modalities are not well understood.METHODS: This study aimed to determine the pooled effects of supervised exercise interventions on CRF in breast cancer survivors. We searched PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, CENTRAL and CINAHL databases between December 2013 and January 2014 without language restrictions. Risk of bias and methodological quality were evaluated using the PEDro score. Pooled effects were calculated with a random-effects model according to the DerSimonian and Laird method. Heterogeneity was evaluated with the I (2) test.RESULTS: Nine high-quality studies (n = 1156) were finally included. Supervised aerobic exercise was statistically more effective than conventional care in improving CRF among breast cancer survivors (SMD = -0.51, 95%CI -0.81 to -0.21), with high statistical heterogeneity (P = 0.001; I (2)  = 75%). Similar effects were found for resistance training on CRF (SMD = -0.41, 95%CI -0.76 to -0.05; P = 0.02; I(2) = 64%). Meta-regression analysis revealed that exercise volume parameters are closely related with the effect estimates on CRF. Egger's test suggested moderate evidence of publication bias (P = 0.04).CONCLUSIONS: Supervised exercise reduces CRF and must be implemented in breast cancer rehabilitation settings. High-volume exercises are safe and effective in improving CRF and overall quality of life in women with breast cancer. Further research is encouraged.TRIAL REGISTRATION: CRD42014007223.

AB - BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is the most common and distressing symptom in breast cancer survivors. Approximately 40% to 80% of cancer patients undergoing active treatment suffer from CRF. Exercise improves overall quality of life and CRF; however, the specific effects of the training modalities are not well understood.METHODS: This study aimed to determine the pooled effects of supervised exercise interventions on CRF in breast cancer survivors. We searched PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, CENTRAL and CINAHL databases between December 2013 and January 2014 without language restrictions. Risk of bias and methodological quality were evaluated using the PEDro score. Pooled effects were calculated with a random-effects model according to the DerSimonian and Laird method. Heterogeneity was evaluated with the I (2) test.RESULTS: Nine high-quality studies (n = 1156) were finally included. Supervised aerobic exercise was statistically more effective than conventional care in improving CRF among breast cancer survivors (SMD = -0.51, 95%CI -0.81 to -0.21), with high statistical heterogeneity (P = 0.001; I (2)  = 75%). Similar effects were found for resistance training on CRF (SMD = -0.41, 95%CI -0.76 to -0.05; P = 0.02; I(2) = 64%). Meta-regression analysis revealed that exercise volume parameters are closely related with the effect estimates on CRF. Egger's test suggested moderate evidence of publication bias (P = 0.04).CONCLUSIONS: Supervised exercise reduces CRF and must be implemented in breast cancer rehabilitation settings. High-volume exercises are safe and effective in improving CRF and overall quality of life in women with breast cancer. Further research is encouraged.TRIAL REGISTRATION: CRD42014007223.

U2 - 10.1186/s12885-015-1069-4

DO - 10.1186/s12885-015-1069-4

M3 - Article

SP - 77

JO - BMC Cancer

JF - BMC Cancer

SN - 1471-2407

ER -