Divergent habitat use of two urban lizard species

K.M. Winchell, E.J. Carlen, A.R. Puente-Rolón, L.J. Revell

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

11 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Faunal responses to anthropogenic habitat modification represent an important aspect of global change. In Puerto Rico, two species of arboreal lizard, Anolis cristatellus and A. stratulus, are commonly encountered in urban areas, yet seem to use the urban habitat in different ways. In this study, we quantified differences in habitat use between these two species in an urban setting. For each species, we measured habitat use and preference, and the niche space of each taxon, with respect to manmade features of the urban environment. To measure niche space of these species in an urban environment, we collected data from a total of six urban sites across four different municipalities on the island of Puerto Rico. We quantified relative abundance of both species, their habitat use, and the available habitat in the environment to measure both microhabitat preference in an urban setting, as well as niche partitioning between the two different lizards. Overall, we found that the two species utilize different portions of the urban habitat. Anolis stratulus tends to use more “natural” portions of the urban environment (i.e., trees and other cultivated vegetation), whereas A. cristatellus more frequently uses anthropogenic structures. We also found that aspects of habitat discrimination in urban areas mirror a pattern measured in prior studies for forested sites in which A. stratulus was found to perch higher than A. cristatellus and preferred lower temperatures and greater canopy cover. In our study, we found that the multivariate niche space occupied by A. stratulus did not differ from the available niche space in natural portions of the urban environment and in turn represented a subset of the niche space occupied by A. cristatellus. The unique niche space occupied by A. cristatellus corresponds to manmade aspects of the urban environment generally not utilized by A. stratulus. Our results demonstrate that some species are merely tolerant of urbanization while others utilize urban habitats in novel ways. This finding has implications for long-term persistence in urban habitats and suggests that loss of natural habitat elements may lead to nonrandom species extirpations as urbanization intensifies. © 2017 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
Idioma originalEnglish (US)
Páginas (desde-hasta)25-35
Número de páginas11
PublicaciónEcology and Evolution
Volumen8
N.º1
DOI
EstadoPublished - 2018

Huella dactilar

habitat use
lizard
lizards
niche
niches
habitats
habitat
Anolis
urbanization
Puerto Rico
urban area
urban areas
niche partitioning
urban site
habitat selection
microhabitat
global change
relative abundance
persistence
perch

Citar esto

Winchell, K. M., Carlen, E. J., Puente-Rolón, A. R., & Revell, L. J. (2018). Divergent habitat use of two urban lizard species. Ecology and Evolution, 8(1), 25-35. https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.3600
Winchell, K.M. ; Carlen, E.J. ; Puente-Rolón, A.R. ; Revell, L.J. / Divergent habitat use of two urban lizard species. En: Ecology and Evolution. 2018 ; Vol. 8, N.º 1. pp. 25-35.
@article{53ad1c3130a242d89f5bee23faa14309,
title = "Divergent habitat use of two urban lizard species",
abstract = "Faunal responses to anthropogenic habitat modification represent an important aspect of global change. In Puerto Rico, two species of arboreal lizard, Anolis cristatellus and A. stratulus, are commonly encountered in urban areas, yet seem to use the urban habitat in different ways. In this study, we quantified differences in habitat use between these two species in an urban setting. For each species, we measured habitat use and preference, and the niche space of each taxon, with respect to manmade features of the urban environment. To measure niche space of these species in an urban environment, we collected data from a total of six urban sites across four different municipalities on the island of Puerto Rico. We quantified relative abundance of both species, their habitat use, and the available habitat in the environment to measure both microhabitat preference in an urban setting, as well as niche partitioning between the two different lizards. Overall, we found that the two species utilize different portions of the urban habitat. Anolis stratulus tends to use more “natural” portions of the urban environment (i.e., trees and other cultivated vegetation), whereas A. cristatellus more frequently uses anthropogenic structures. We also found that aspects of habitat discrimination in urban areas mirror a pattern measured in prior studies for forested sites in which A. stratulus was found to perch higher than A. cristatellus and preferred lower temperatures and greater canopy cover. In our study, we found that the multivariate niche space occupied by A. stratulus did not differ from the available niche space in natural portions of the urban environment and in turn represented a subset of the niche space occupied by A. cristatellus. The unique niche space occupied by A. cristatellus corresponds to manmade aspects of the urban environment generally not utilized by A. stratulus. Our results demonstrate that some species are merely tolerant of urbanization while others utilize urban habitats in novel ways. This finding has implications for long-term persistence in urban habitats and suggests that loss of natural habitat elements may lead to nonrandom species extirpations as urbanization intensifies. {\circledC} 2017 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.",
author = "K.M. Winchell and E.J. Carlen and A.R. Puente-Rol{\'o}n and L.J. Revell",
note = "Export Date: 17 April 2018 Correspondence Address: Winchell, K.M.; Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts BostonUnited States; email: kristin.winchell001@umb.edu Funding details: BIO, Directorate for Biological Sciences Funding details: NSF, National Science Foundation Funding details: DEB 1354044, NSF, National Science Foundation Funding details: SEMARNAT, Secretar{\'i}a de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales Funding text: Directorate for Biological Sciences (National Science Foundation), Grant/Award Number: Funding text: We thank University of Puerto Rico in Arecibo and Interamerican University in Arecibo for allowing us to conduct this research on their campuses. We thank J. Li for assistance in the field, and the following people for advice in planning and conducting the study: S. Vega-Castillo, J. Kolbe, D. MuD䬀iWz. e also thank the following people for providing valuable feedback on this manuscript: J. Losos, C. Donihue, A. Kamath, O. LaPiedra, A. Geneva, P. Muralidhar, S. Prado-Irwin, and the many people who offered constructive comments at the Joint Meeting of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists. This study was conducted under Permit #2014-IC-024 (O-VS-PVS15-SJ-00375-22042014) from the Puerto Rico Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Ambientales (DRNA). This research was funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation to LJR (DEB 1354044). References: Ackley, J.W., Muelleman, P.J., Carter, R.E., Henderson, R.W., Powell, R., A rapid assessment of herpetofaunal diversity in variously altered habitats on Dominica (2009) Applied Herpetology, 6, pp. 171-184. , https://doi.org/10.1163/157075408X394124; Aronson, M.F.J., La Sorte, F.A., Nilon, C.H., Katti, M., Goddard, M.A., Lepczyk, C.A., Winter, M., A global analysis of the impacts of urbanization on bird and plant diversity reveals key anthropogenic drivers (2014) Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 281, p. 20133330. , https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2013.3330; Cartmill, M., Climbing (1985) Functional vertebrate morphology, pp. 73-88. , In, M. Hildebrand, D. M. Bramble, K. F. Liem, #x0026;, D. B. Wake, (Eds.),, Cambridge, MA, Belknap; Cooper, W.E., Jr., Ecomorphological variation in foraging behaviour by Puerto Rican Anolis lizards (2005) Journal of Zoology, 265, pp. 133-139. , https://doi.org/10.1017/S0952836904006065; Cooper, W.E., Jr., Risk factors affecting escape behaviour by Puerto Rican Anolis lizards (2006) Canadian Journal of Zoology, 84, pp. 495-504. , https://doi.org/10.1139/z06-018; Donihue, C.M., Lambert, M.R., Adaptive evolution in urban ecosystems (2015) Ambio, 44, pp. 194-203. , https://doi.org/10.1007/s13280-014-0547-2; Forman, R.T.T., (2014) Urban ecology: Science of cities, , Cambridge, UK, Cambridge University Press; Genet, K.S., Genet, J.A., Burton, T.M., Murphy, P.G., The lizard community of a subtropical dry forest: Gu{\'a}nica forest, Puerto Rico (2001) Tropical Ecology, 42, pp. 97-109; Germano, J.M., Sander, J.M., Henderson, R.W., Powell, R., Herpetofaunal communities in Grenada: A comparison of altered sites, with an annotated checklist of Grenadian amphibians and reptiles (2003) Caribbean Journal of Science, 39, pp. 68-76; Grant, B.W., Middendorf, G., Colgan, M.J., Ahmad, H., Vogel, M.B., Ecology of urban amphibians and reptiles: Urbanophiles, urbanophobes, and the urbanoblivious (2011) Urban ecology, pp. 167-178. , https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199563562.001.0001, #x0026;, In, J. Niemela, (Ed.),, Oxford, UK, Oxford University Press; Harris, S.E., Munshi-South, J., Obergfell, C., O'Neill, R., Signatures of rapid evolution in urban and rural transcriptomes of white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) in the New York metropolitan area (2013) PLoS ONE, 8. , https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0074938; Heatwole, H., Relationship of escape behavior and camouflage in Anoline lizards (1968) Copeia, 1, pp. 109-113. , https://doi.org/10.2307/1441557; Heatwole, H., Lin, T., Villal{\'o}n, E., Mu{\~n}iz, A., Matta, A., Some aspects of the thermal ecology of the Puerto Rican Anoline lizards (1969) Journal of Herpetology, 3, pp. 65-77. , https://doi.org/10.2307/1563225; Helmer, E.H., Forest conservation and land development in Puerto Rico (2004) Landscape Ecology, 19, pp. 29-40. , https://doi.org/10.1023/B:LAND.0000018364.68514.fb; Henderson, R.W., Powell, R., Responses by the West Indian herpetofauna to human-influenced resources (2001) Caribbean Journal of Science, 37, pp. 41-54; Hertz, P.E., Evaluating thermal resource partitioning by sympatric lizards Anolis cooki and Anolis cristatellus: A field test using null hypotheses (1992) Oecologia, 90, pp. 127-136. , https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00317818; Hothorn, T., Hornik, K., Zeileis, A., Unbiased recursive partitioning: A conditional inference framework (2006) Journal of Computational and Graphical Statistics, 15, pp. 651-674. , https://doi.org/10.1198/106186006X133933; Koenig, N., (1953) A comprehensive agricultural program for Puerto Rico, , Washington, D.C., USA, US Department of Agriculture and Commonwealth of Puerto Rico; Kolbe, J.J., Battles, A.C., Avil{\'e}s-Rodr{\'i}guez, K.J., City slickers: Poor performance does not deter Anolis lizards from using artificial substrates in human-modified habitats (2015) Functional Ecology, 30, pp. 1418-1429. , https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2435.12607; L{\'o}pez, T.M., Aide, T.M., Thomlinson, J.R., Urban expansion and the loss of prime agricultural lands in Puerto Rico (2001) Ambio, 30, pp. 49-54. , https://doi.org/10.1579/0044-7447-30.1.49; Losos, J.B., (2009) Lizards in an evolutionary tree: Ecology and adaptive radiation of anoles, , Berkeley, CA, University of California Press; Mallery, C.S., Marcum, M.A., Powell, R., Parmerlee, J.S., Henderson, R.W., Herpetofaunal communities of the leeward slopes and coasts of St. Vincent: A comparison of sites variously altered by human activity (2003) Applied Herpetology, 4, pp. 313-325. , https://doi.org/10.1163/157075407782424494; Marnocha, E., Pollinger, J., Smith, T.B., Human-induced morphological shifts in an island lizard (2011) Evolutionary Applications, 4, pp. 388-396. , https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1752-4571.2010.00170.x; Martinuzzi, S., Gould, W.A., Ramos Gonz{\'a}lez, O.M., Land development, land use, and urban sprawl in Puerto Rico integrating remote sensing and population census data (2007) Landscape and Urban Planning, 79, pp. 288-297. , https://doi.org/10.1016/j.landurbplan.2006.02.014; McKinney, M.L., Urbanization, biodiversity, and conservation (2002) BioScience, 52, pp. 883-890. , https://doi.org/10.1641/0006-3568(2002)052[0883:UBAC]2.0.CO;2; McKinney, M.L., Urbanization as a major cause of biotic homogenization (2006) Biological Conservation, 127, pp. 247-260. , https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2005.09.005; McKinney, M.L., Effects of urbanization on species richness: A review of plants and animals (2008) Urban Ecosystems, 11, pp. 161-176. , https://doi.org/10.1007/s11252-007-0045-4; Miller, G.L., Lugo, A.E., (2009) Guide to the ecological systems of Puerto Rico, , #x0026;, General Technical Report IITF-GTR-35, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, International Institute of Tropical Forestry, San Juan, Puerto Rico, USA; Nicholson, K.L., Torrence, S.M., Ghioca, D.M., Bhattacharjee, J., Andrei, A.E., Owen, J., Perry, G., The influence of temperature and humidity on activity patterns of the lizards Anolis stratulus and Ameiva exsul in the British Virgin Islands (2005) Caribbean Journal of Science, 41, pp. 870-873; Perry, G., Buchanan, B.W., Fisher, R.N., Salmon, M., Wise, S.E., Effects of artificial night lighting on amphibians and reptiles in urban environments (2008) Urban herpetology, pp. 239-256. , #x0026;, In, J. C. Mitchell, R. E. Jung Brown, #x0026;, B. Bartholomew, (Eds.),, Salt Lake City, UT, Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles; Powell, B.J., Leal, M., Brain organization and habitat complexity in Anolis lizards (2014) Brain, Behavior, and Evolution, 84, pp. 8-18. , https://doi.org/10.1159/000362197; (2012) R: A language and environment for statistical computing, , Vienna, Austria, R Foundation for Statistical Computing; Rand, A.S., Ecological distribution in Anoline lizards of Puerto Rico (1964) Ecology, 45, pp. 745-752. , https://doi.org/10.2307/1934922; Reagan, D.P., Congeneric species distribution and abundance in a three-dimensional habitat: The rain forest anoles of Puerto Rico (1992) Copeia, 1992 (2), pp. 392-403. , https://doi.org/10.2307/1446199; Rodda, G.H., Perry, G., Rondeau, R.J., Lazell, J., The densest terrestrial vertebrate (2001) Journal of Tropical Ecology, 17, pp. 331-338. , https://doi.org/10.1017/S0266467401001225; Shochat, E., Lerman, S.B., Anderies, J.M., Warren, P.S., Faeth, S.H., Nilon, C.H., Invasion, competition, and biodiversity loss in urban ecosystems (2010) BioScience, 60, pp. 199-208. , https://doi.org/10.1525/bio.2010.60.3.6; Shochat, E., Warren, P.S., Faeth, S.H., McIntyre, N.E., Hope, D., From patterns to emerging processes in mechanistic urban ecology (2006) Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 21, pp. 186-191. , https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2005.11.019; (2012) World Urbanization Prospects, the 2011 Revision. Final Report with Annex Tables, , United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division, New York, NY; (2012) 2010 Census of Population and Housing, Summary Population and Housing Characteristics, CPH-1-53, Puerto Rico, , U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., USA; Winchell, K.M., Reynolds, R.G., Prado-Irwin, S.R., Puente-Rol{\'o}n, A.R., Revell, L.J., Phenotypic shifts in urban areas in the tropical lizard Anolis cristatellus (2016) Evolution, 70, pp. 1009-1022. , https://doi.org/10.1111/evo.2016.70.issue-5",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1002/ece3.3600",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
pages = "25--35",
journal = "Ecology and Evolution",
issn = "2045-7758",
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Winchell, KM, Carlen, EJ, Puente-Rolón, AR & Revell, LJ 2018, 'Divergent habitat use of two urban lizard species', Ecology and Evolution, vol. 8, n.º 1, pp. 25-35. https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.3600

Divergent habitat use of two urban lizard species. / Winchell, K.M.; Carlen, E.J.; Puente-Rolón, A.R.; Revell, L.J.

En: Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 8, N.º 1, 2018, p. 25-35.

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

TY - JOUR

T1 - Divergent habitat use of two urban lizard species

AU - Winchell, K.M.

AU - Carlen, E.J.

AU - Puente-Rolón, A.R.

AU - Revell, L.J.

N1 - Export Date: 17 April 2018 Correspondence Address: Winchell, K.M.; Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts BostonUnited States; email: kristin.winchell001@umb.edu Funding details: BIO, Directorate for Biological Sciences Funding details: NSF, National Science Foundation Funding details: DEB 1354044, NSF, National Science Foundation Funding details: SEMARNAT, Secretaría de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales Funding text: Directorate for Biological Sciences (National Science Foundation), Grant/Award Number: Funding text: We thank University of Puerto Rico in Arecibo and Interamerican University in Arecibo for allowing us to conduct this research on their campuses. We thank J. Li for assistance in the field, and the following people for advice in planning and conducting the study: S. Vega-Castillo, J. Kolbe, D. MuD䬀iWz. e also thank the following people for providing valuable feedback on this manuscript: J. Losos, C. Donihue, A. Kamath, O. LaPiedra, A. Geneva, P. Muralidhar, S. Prado-Irwin, and the many people who offered constructive comments at the Joint Meeting of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists. This study was conducted under Permit #2014-IC-024 (O-VS-PVS15-SJ-00375-22042014) from the Puerto Rico Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Ambientales (DRNA). This research was funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation to LJR (DEB 1354044). References: Ackley, J.W., Muelleman, P.J., Carter, R.E., Henderson, R.W., Powell, R., A rapid assessment of herpetofaunal diversity in variously altered habitats on Dominica (2009) Applied Herpetology, 6, pp. 171-184. , https://doi.org/10.1163/157075408X394124; Aronson, M.F.J., La Sorte, F.A., Nilon, C.H., Katti, M., Goddard, M.A., Lepczyk, C.A., Winter, M., A global analysis of the impacts of urbanization on bird and plant diversity reveals key anthropogenic drivers (2014) Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 281, p. 20133330. , https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2013.3330; Cartmill, M., Climbing (1985) Functional vertebrate morphology, pp. 73-88. , In, M. Hildebrand, D. M. Bramble, K. F. Liem, #x0026;, D. B. Wake, (Eds.),, Cambridge, MA, Belknap; Cooper, W.E., Jr., Ecomorphological variation in foraging behaviour by Puerto Rican Anolis lizards (2005) Journal of Zoology, 265, pp. 133-139. , https://doi.org/10.1017/S0952836904006065; Cooper, W.E., Jr., Risk factors affecting escape behaviour by Puerto Rican Anolis lizards (2006) Canadian Journal of Zoology, 84, pp. 495-504. , https://doi.org/10.1139/z06-018; Donihue, C.M., Lambert, M.R., Adaptive evolution in urban ecosystems (2015) Ambio, 44, pp. 194-203. , https://doi.org/10.1007/s13280-014-0547-2; Forman, R.T.T., (2014) Urban ecology: Science of cities, , Cambridge, UK, Cambridge University Press; Genet, K.S., Genet, J.A., Burton, T.M., Murphy, P.G., The lizard community of a subtropical dry forest: Guánica forest, Puerto Rico (2001) Tropical Ecology, 42, pp. 97-109; Germano, J.M., Sander, J.M., Henderson, R.W., Powell, R., Herpetofaunal communities in Grenada: A comparison of altered sites, with an annotated checklist of Grenadian amphibians and reptiles (2003) Caribbean Journal of Science, 39, pp. 68-76; Grant, B.W., Middendorf, G., Colgan, M.J., Ahmad, H., Vogel, M.B., Ecology of urban amphibians and reptiles: Urbanophiles, urbanophobes, and the urbanoblivious (2011) Urban ecology, pp. 167-178. , https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199563562.001.0001, #x0026;, In, J. Niemela, (Ed.),, Oxford, UK, Oxford University Press; Harris, S.E., Munshi-South, J., Obergfell, C., O'Neill, R., Signatures of rapid evolution in urban and rural transcriptomes of white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) in the New York metropolitan area (2013) PLoS ONE, 8. , https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0074938; Heatwole, H., Relationship of escape behavior and camouflage in Anoline lizards (1968) Copeia, 1, pp. 109-113. , https://doi.org/10.2307/1441557; Heatwole, H., Lin, T., Villalón, E., Muñiz, A., Matta, A., Some aspects of the thermal ecology of the Puerto Rican Anoline lizards (1969) Journal of Herpetology, 3, pp. 65-77. , https://doi.org/10.2307/1563225; Helmer, E.H., Forest conservation and land development in Puerto Rico (2004) Landscape Ecology, 19, pp. 29-40. , https://doi.org/10.1023/B:LAND.0000018364.68514.fb; Henderson, R.W., Powell, R., Responses by the West Indian herpetofauna to human-influenced resources (2001) Caribbean Journal of Science, 37, pp. 41-54; Hertz, P.E., Evaluating thermal resource partitioning by sympatric lizards Anolis cooki and Anolis cristatellus: A field test using null hypotheses (1992) Oecologia, 90, pp. 127-136. , https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00317818; Hothorn, T., Hornik, K., Zeileis, A., Unbiased recursive partitioning: A conditional inference framework (2006) Journal of Computational and Graphical Statistics, 15, pp. 651-674. , https://doi.org/10.1198/106186006X133933; Koenig, N., (1953) A comprehensive agricultural program for Puerto Rico, , Washington, D.C., USA, US Department of Agriculture and Commonwealth of Puerto Rico; Kolbe, J.J., Battles, A.C., Avilés-Rodríguez, K.J., City slickers: Poor performance does not deter Anolis lizards from using artificial substrates in human-modified habitats (2015) Functional Ecology, 30, pp. 1418-1429. , https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2435.12607; López, T.M., Aide, T.M., Thomlinson, J.R., Urban expansion and the loss of prime agricultural lands in Puerto Rico (2001) Ambio, 30, pp. 49-54. , https://doi.org/10.1579/0044-7447-30.1.49; Losos, J.B., (2009) Lizards in an evolutionary tree: Ecology and adaptive radiation of anoles, , Berkeley, CA, University of California Press; Mallery, C.S., Marcum, M.A., Powell, R., Parmerlee, J.S., Henderson, R.W., Herpetofaunal communities of the leeward slopes and coasts of St. Vincent: A comparison of sites variously altered by human activity (2003) Applied Herpetology, 4, pp. 313-325. , https://doi.org/10.1163/157075407782424494; Marnocha, E., Pollinger, J., Smith, T.B., Human-induced morphological shifts in an island lizard (2011) Evolutionary Applications, 4, pp. 388-396. , https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1752-4571.2010.00170.x; Martinuzzi, S., Gould, W.A., Ramos González, O.M., Land development, land use, and urban sprawl in Puerto Rico integrating remote sensing and population census data (2007) Landscape and Urban Planning, 79, pp. 288-297. , https://doi.org/10.1016/j.landurbplan.2006.02.014; McKinney, M.L., Urbanization, biodiversity, and conservation (2002) BioScience, 52, pp. 883-890. , https://doi.org/10.1641/0006-3568(2002)052[0883:UBAC]2.0.CO;2; McKinney, M.L., Urbanization as a major cause of biotic homogenization (2006) Biological Conservation, 127, pp. 247-260. , https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2005.09.005; McKinney, M.L., Effects of urbanization on species richness: A review of plants and animals (2008) Urban Ecosystems, 11, pp. 161-176. , https://doi.org/10.1007/s11252-007-0045-4; Miller, G.L., Lugo, A.E., (2009) Guide to the ecological systems of Puerto Rico, , #x0026;, General Technical Report IITF-GTR-35, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, International Institute of Tropical Forestry, San Juan, Puerto Rico, USA; Nicholson, K.L., Torrence, S.M., Ghioca, D.M., Bhattacharjee, J., Andrei, A.E., Owen, J., Perry, G., The influence of temperature and humidity on activity patterns of the lizards Anolis stratulus and Ameiva exsul in the British Virgin Islands (2005) Caribbean Journal of Science, 41, pp. 870-873; Perry, G., Buchanan, B.W., Fisher, R.N., Salmon, M., Wise, S.E., Effects of artificial night lighting on amphibians and reptiles in urban environments (2008) Urban herpetology, pp. 239-256. , #x0026;, In, J. C. Mitchell, R. E. Jung Brown, #x0026;, B. Bartholomew, (Eds.),, Salt Lake City, UT, Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles; Powell, B.J., Leal, M., Brain organization and habitat complexity in Anolis lizards (2014) Brain, Behavior, and Evolution, 84, pp. 8-18. , https://doi.org/10.1159/000362197; (2012) R: A language and environment for statistical computing, , Vienna, Austria, R Foundation for Statistical Computing; Rand, A.S., Ecological distribution in Anoline lizards of Puerto Rico (1964) Ecology, 45, pp. 745-752. , https://doi.org/10.2307/1934922; Reagan, D.P., Congeneric species distribution and abundance in a three-dimensional habitat: The rain forest anoles of Puerto Rico (1992) Copeia, 1992 (2), pp. 392-403. , https://doi.org/10.2307/1446199; Rodda, G.H., Perry, G., Rondeau, R.J., Lazell, J., The densest terrestrial vertebrate (2001) Journal of Tropical Ecology, 17, pp. 331-338. , https://doi.org/10.1017/S0266467401001225; Shochat, E., Lerman, S.B., Anderies, J.M., Warren, P.S., Faeth, S.H., Nilon, C.H., Invasion, competition, and biodiversity loss in urban ecosystems (2010) BioScience, 60, pp. 199-208. , https://doi.org/10.1525/bio.2010.60.3.6; Shochat, E., Warren, P.S., Faeth, S.H., McIntyre, N.E., Hope, D., From patterns to emerging processes in mechanistic urban ecology (2006) Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 21, pp. 186-191. , https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2005.11.019; (2012) World Urbanization Prospects, the 2011 Revision. Final Report with Annex Tables, , United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division, New York, NY; (2012) 2010 Census of Population and Housing, Summary Population and Housing Characteristics, CPH-1-53, Puerto Rico, , U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., USA; Winchell, K.M., Reynolds, R.G., Prado-Irwin, S.R., Puente-Rolón, A.R., Revell, L.J., Phenotypic shifts in urban areas in the tropical lizard Anolis cristatellus (2016) Evolution, 70, pp. 1009-1022. , https://doi.org/10.1111/evo.2016.70.issue-5

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Faunal responses to anthropogenic habitat modification represent an important aspect of global change. In Puerto Rico, two species of arboreal lizard, Anolis cristatellus and A. stratulus, are commonly encountered in urban areas, yet seem to use the urban habitat in different ways. In this study, we quantified differences in habitat use between these two species in an urban setting. For each species, we measured habitat use and preference, and the niche space of each taxon, with respect to manmade features of the urban environment. To measure niche space of these species in an urban environment, we collected data from a total of six urban sites across four different municipalities on the island of Puerto Rico. We quantified relative abundance of both species, their habitat use, and the available habitat in the environment to measure both microhabitat preference in an urban setting, as well as niche partitioning between the two different lizards. Overall, we found that the two species utilize different portions of the urban habitat. Anolis stratulus tends to use more “natural” portions of the urban environment (i.e., trees and other cultivated vegetation), whereas A. cristatellus more frequently uses anthropogenic structures. We also found that aspects of habitat discrimination in urban areas mirror a pattern measured in prior studies for forested sites in which A. stratulus was found to perch higher than A. cristatellus and preferred lower temperatures and greater canopy cover. In our study, we found that the multivariate niche space occupied by A. stratulus did not differ from the available niche space in natural portions of the urban environment and in turn represented a subset of the niche space occupied by A. cristatellus. The unique niche space occupied by A. cristatellus corresponds to manmade aspects of the urban environment generally not utilized by A. stratulus. Our results demonstrate that some species are merely tolerant of urbanization while others utilize urban habitats in novel ways. This finding has implications for long-term persistence in urban habitats and suggests that loss of natural habitat elements may lead to nonrandom species extirpations as urbanization intensifies. © 2017 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

AB - Faunal responses to anthropogenic habitat modification represent an important aspect of global change. In Puerto Rico, two species of arboreal lizard, Anolis cristatellus and A. stratulus, are commonly encountered in urban areas, yet seem to use the urban habitat in different ways. In this study, we quantified differences in habitat use between these two species in an urban setting. For each species, we measured habitat use and preference, and the niche space of each taxon, with respect to manmade features of the urban environment. To measure niche space of these species in an urban environment, we collected data from a total of six urban sites across four different municipalities on the island of Puerto Rico. We quantified relative abundance of both species, their habitat use, and the available habitat in the environment to measure both microhabitat preference in an urban setting, as well as niche partitioning between the two different lizards. Overall, we found that the two species utilize different portions of the urban habitat. Anolis stratulus tends to use more “natural” portions of the urban environment (i.e., trees and other cultivated vegetation), whereas A. cristatellus more frequently uses anthropogenic structures. We also found that aspects of habitat discrimination in urban areas mirror a pattern measured in prior studies for forested sites in which A. stratulus was found to perch higher than A. cristatellus and preferred lower temperatures and greater canopy cover. In our study, we found that the multivariate niche space occupied by A. stratulus did not differ from the available niche space in natural portions of the urban environment and in turn represented a subset of the niche space occupied by A. cristatellus. The unique niche space occupied by A. cristatellus corresponds to manmade aspects of the urban environment generally not utilized by A. stratulus. Our results demonstrate that some species are merely tolerant of urbanization while others utilize urban habitats in novel ways. This finding has implications for long-term persistence in urban habitats and suggests that loss of natural habitat elements may lead to nonrandom species extirpations as urbanization intensifies. © 2017 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

U2 - 10.1002/ece3.3600

DO - 10.1002/ece3.3600

M3 - Article

C2 - 29321848

VL - 8

SP - 25

EP - 35

JO - Ecology and Evolution

JF - Ecology and Evolution

SN - 2045-7758

IS - 1

ER -

Winchell KM, Carlen EJ, Puente-Rolón AR, Revell LJ. Divergent habitat use of two urban lizard species. Ecology and Evolution. 2018;8(1):25-35. https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.3600