Developmental indigenism: Cultural and state difference in the Amazon’s border

Esteban Rozo Pabon, Carlos Del Cairo

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

Resumen

This article explores “developmental indigenism” as a particular articulation of the “indigenist” policies of the Colombian state, which started to take shape at the end of the 1950s. We describe and analyze the implementation and consolidation of “developmental indigenism” in a frontier region such as Guainía. Based on documents, letters and reports, we show how “developmental indigenism” entailed a double adequation between state agents and indigenous communities. Understanding this double adequation destabilizes simplifications regarding how state and indigeneity are constructed in frontier regions such as Amazonia. © 2017, Universidad de los Andes, Bogota Colombia. All rights reserved.
Idioma originalEnglish (US)
Páginas (desde-hasta)163-182
Número de páginas29
PublicaciónHistoria Critica
Volumen2017
N.º65
EstadoPublished - jun 2017

Citar esto

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Developmental indigenism: Cultural and state difference in the Amazon’s border. / Rozo Pabon, Esteban; Del Cairo, Carlos.

En: Historia Critica, Vol. 2017, N.º 65, 06.2017, p. 163-182.

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

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