Consumer demand for urban forest ecosystem services and disservices: Examining trade-offs using choice experiments and best-worst scaling

J.R. Soto, F.J. Escobedo, H. Khachatryan, D.C. Adams

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

6 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Many studies value urban ecosystem service benefits using residents’ willingness to pay and supply-side analyses of ecosystem attributes. But, few studies account for consumer demand and ecosystem disservices. To address this gap we surveyed 1052 homeowners eliciting consumer demand for key urban forest ecosystem attributes and service-disservice levels in both their properties and surrounding neighborhood. We use an approach integrating focus group, field data, and surveys to identify consumer preferences and trade-offs between urban forest ecosystem structure-functional attributes and their level of services and disservices. This method, called best worst choice, produces more estimates of utility while reducing the likelihood of introducing biases associated with human cognitive tendencies. Results indicate that consumer choices for property value were highest followed by tree condition, a structural proxy for minimizing disservices, and tree shade, a functional proxy for temperature regulation. We also found evidence of trade-offs in demand for different ecosystem services, significant scale effects, and that willingness to pay for ecosystem disservices was negative. Findings suggest that management, and studies that value and map ecosystem services, using fixed scales should account for end-user demand and functional traits, as consumers can discern trade-offs in benefits and disservices across different cognitive and spatial scales. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.
Idioma originalEnglish
Páginas (desde-hasta)31-39
Número de páginas9
PublicaciónEcosystem Services
Volumen29
DOI
EstadoPublished - 2018

Huella dactilar

urban ecosystem
consumer demand
scaling
ecosystem service
ecosystem services
forest ecosystems
forest ecosystem
Ecosystem
willingness to pay
consumer preferences
ecosystems
demand
experiment
homeowners
ecosystem
shade trees
focus groups
homeowner
ecosystem structure
scale effect

Citar esto

@article{5a883f2c479e44da80113fb2a6e59da8,
title = "Consumer demand for urban forest ecosystem services and disservices: Examining trade-offs using choice experiments and best-worst scaling",
abstract = "Many studies value urban ecosystem service benefits using residents’ willingness to pay and supply-side analyses of ecosystem attributes. But, few studies account for consumer demand and ecosystem disservices. To address this gap we surveyed 1052 homeowners eliciting consumer demand for key urban forest ecosystem attributes and service-disservice levels in both their properties and surrounding neighborhood. We use an approach integrating focus group, field data, and surveys to identify consumer preferences and trade-offs between urban forest ecosystem structure-functional attributes and their level of services and disservices. This method, called best worst choice, produces more estimates of utility while reducing the likelihood of introducing biases associated with human cognitive tendencies. Results indicate that consumer choices for property value were highest followed by tree condition, a structural proxy for minimizing disservices, and tree shade, a functional proxy for temperature regulation. We also found evidence of trade-offs in demand for different ecosystem services, significant scale effects, and that willingness to pay for ecosystem disservices was negative. Findings suggest that management, and studies that value and map ecosystem services, using fixed scales should account for end-user demand and functional traits, as consumers can discern trade-offs in benefits and disservices across different cognitive and spatial scales. {\circledC} 2017 Elsevier B.V.",
author = "J.R. Soto and F.J. Escobedo and H. Khachatryan and D.C. Adams",
note = "Export Date: 14 December 2017 Correspondence Address: Escobedo, F.J.; Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Biology Program, Universidad del Rosario, Kr 26 No 63B-48, Colombia; email: franciscoj.escobedo@urosario.edu.co Funding details: USDA, U.S. Department of Agriculture Funding details: FLA-FOR-005278 Funding text: We thank the United States Department of Agriculture’s McIntire-Stennis program and Florida Agricultural research project for funding this project (FLA-FOR-005278). We also thank Andrew Koeser for providing suggestions and photos for the survey and the reviewers of this manuscript. Appendix A References: Adams, D.C., Bwenge, F., Lee, D.J., Larkin, S., Alavalapati, J.R.R., Public preferences for controlling upland invasive plants in state parks: application of a choice model (2011) Forest Policy Econ., 13 (6), pp. 465-472; Allen, K.E., Moore, R., Moving beyond the exchange value in the nonmarket valuation of ecosystem services (2016) Ecosyst. Serv., 18, pp. 78-86; Barrena, J., Nahuelhual, L., B{\'a}ez, A., Schiappacasse, I., Cerda, C., Valuing cultural ecosystem services: agricultural heritage in Chilo{\'e} island, southern Chile (2014) Ecosyst. Serv., 7, pp. 66-75; Bertram, C., Rehdanz, K., The role of urban green space for human well-being (2015) Ecol. Econ., 120, pp. 139-152; Campbell, D., Erdem, S., Position bias in best-worst scaling surveys: a case study on trust in institutions (2015) Am. J. Agric. Econ., 97, pp. 526-545; Chen, W.Y., Hua, J., Citizens' distrust of government and their protest responses in a contingent valuation study of urban heritage trees in Guangzhou, China (2015) J. Environ. Manage., 155, pp. 40-48; Coast, J., Salisbury, C., De Berker, D., Noble, A., Horrocks, S., Peters, T.J., Flynn, T.N., Preferences for aspects of a dermatology consultation (2006) Br. J. Dermatol., 155 (2), pp. 387-392; Dobbs, C., Escobedo, F., Zipperer, W., A framework for developing urban forest ecosystem services and goods indicators (2011) Landscape Urban Planning, 99, pp. 196-206; Dillman, D.A., Smyth, J.D., Christian, L.M., Internet, Mail, and Mixed-Mode Surveys: The Tailored Design Method (2009), 3rd ed. John Wiley & Sons Inc Hoboken, NJ; Escobedo, F., Luley, C., Bond, J., Staudhammer, C., Bartel, C., A hurricane debris and damage assessment for Florida urban forests (2009) Arboricult. Urban For., 35 (2), pp. 100-106; Escobedo, F.J., Kroeger, T., Wagner, J.E., Urban forests and pollution mitigation: Analyzing ecosystem services and disservices (2011) Environ. Pollut., 159 (8), pp. 2078-2087; Escobedo, F.J., Adams, D.C., Timilsina, N., Urban forest structure effects on property value (2015) Ecosyst. Serv., 12, pp. 209-217; Flynn, T.N., Louviere, J.J., Peters, T.J., Coast, J., Best–worst scaling: what it can do for health care research and how to do it (2007) J. Health Econ., 26, pp. 171-189; Flynn, T., Louviere, J., Peters, T., Coast, J., Estimating preferences for a dermatology consultation using Best-Worst Scaling: comparison of various methods of analysis (2008) BMC Med. Res. Methodology, 8, pp. 76-88; Giergiczny, M., Kronenberg, J., From valuation to governance: Using choice experiment to value street trees (2014) Ambio, 43 (4), pp. 492-501; G{\'o}mez-Baggethun, E., Barton, D.N., Classifying and valuing ecosystem services for urban planning (2013) Ecol. Econ., 86, pp. 235-245; Greene, W.H., Econometric analysis (2003), Prentice Hall NY, New York; Haab, T.C., McConnell, K.E., Referendum models and negative willingness to pay: alternative solutions (1997) J. Environ. Econ. Manage., 32 (2), pp. 251-270; Hensher, D.A., Rose, J.M., Greene, W.H., Applied Choice Analysis (2015), Cambridge University Press; Horn, J., Escobedo, F.J., Hinkle, R., Hostetler, M., Timilsina, N., The role of composition, invasives, and maintenance emissions on urban forest carbon stocks (2015) Environ. Manage., 55 (2), pp. 431-442; Khachatryan, H., Campbell, B., Hall, C., Behe, B., Yue, C., Dennis, J., The effects of individual environmental concerns and willingness to pay for sustainable plant attributes (2014) HortScience, 49 (1), pp. 69-75; Khachatryan, H., Suh, D.H., Zhou, G., Dukes, M., (2016), Sustainable urban landscaping: consumer preferences and willingness to pay for turfgrass fertilizers. Can. J. Agric. Econ. (accepted); Koeser, A.K., Klein, R.W., Hasing, G., Northrop, R.J., Factors driving professional and public urban tree risk perception (2015) Urban Forest. Urban Greening, 14 (4), pp. 968-974; Kosoy, N., Corbera, E., Payments for ecosystem services as commodity fetishism (2010) Ecol. Econ., 69 (6), pp. 1228-1236; Kreye, M.M., Adams, D.C., Escobedo, F.J., Soto, J.R., Does policy process influence public values for forest-water resource protection in Florida? (2016) Ecol. Econ., 129, pp. 122-131; Latinopoulos, D., Mallios, Z., Latinopoulos, P., Valuing the benefits of an urban park project: A contingent valuation study in Thessaloniki, Greece (2016) Land Use Policy, 55, pp. 130-141; Lo, A.Y., Jim, C.Y., Protest response and willingness to pay for culturally significant urban trees: implications for contingent valuation method (2015) Ecol. Econ., 114, pp. 58-66; Louviere, J., Flynn, T., Carson, R.T., Discrete choice experiments are not conjoint analysis (2010) J. Choice Model, 3 (3), pp. 57-72; Louviere, J., Hensher, D., Swait, J., Stated Choice Methods—Analysis and Application (2000), Cambridge University Press; Louviere, J.J., Islam, T., A comparison of importance weights and willingness-to-pay measures derived from choice-based conjoint, constant sum scales and best–worst scaling (2008) J. Bus. Res., 61 (9), pp. 903-911; Louviere, J.J., Flynn, T.N., Marley, A.A.J., Best Worst Scaling: Theory (2015), Cambridge University Press Methods and Applications; Lusk, J.L., Parker, N., Consumer preferences for fat in ground beef (2009) J. Agric. Appl. Econ., 41 (1), pp. 75-90; Lusk, J.L., Briggeman, B.C., Food values (2009) Am. J. Agric. Econ., 91 (1), pp. 184-196; Mas-Colell, A., Whinston, M.D., Green, J.R., Microeconomic theory (1995), Oxford University Press New York; Pandit, R., Laband, D.N., Energy savings from tree shade (2010) Ecol. Econ., 69 (6), pp. 1324-1329; Siriwardena, S.D., Boyle, K.J., Holmes, T.P., Wiseman, P.E., The implicit value of tree cover in the US: A meta-analysis of hedonic property value studies (2016) Ecol. Econ., 128, pp. 68-76; Soto, J.R., Adams, D.C., Escobedo, F.J., Landowner attitudes and willingness to accept compensation from forest carbon offsets: application of best–worst choice modeling in Florida USA (2016) For. Policy Econ., 63, pp. 35-42; Tadaki, M., Allen, W., Sinner, J., Revealing ecological processes or imposing social rationalities? The politics of bounding and measuring ecosystem services (2015) Ecol. Econ., 118, pp. 168-176; Timilsina, N., Staudhammer, C., Escobedo, F.J., Lawrence, A., Tree biomass, wood waste yield, and carbon storage changes in an urban forest (2014) Landscape Urban Planning, 127, pp. 18-27; Train, K.E., Discrete Choice Methods with Simulation (2003), Cambridge University Press Cambridge, UK; US Census Bureau, (2014), http://factfinder.census.gov, United States Census Bureau. American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates. (Accessed December 1 from), 2016; Wyman, M., Escobedo, F., Stein, T., Orfanedes, M., Northrop, R., Community leader perceptions towards coastal urban forests and hurricanes in Florida (2012) South. J. Appl. For., 36, pp. 152-158; Zhao, M., Escobedo, F.J., Staudhammer, C., Spatial patterns of a subtropical, coastal urban forest: Implications for land tenure, hurricanes, and invasives (2010) Urban For. Urban Green., 9, pp. 205-214",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.11.009",
language = "Ingl{\'e}s",
volume = "29",
pages = "31--39",
journal = "Ecosystem Services",
issn = "2212-0416",
publisher = "Elsevier Science B.V.",

}

Consumer demand for urban forest ecosystem services and disservices: Examining trade-offs using choice experiments and best-worst scaling. / Soto, J.R.; Escobedo, F.J.; Khachatryan, H.; Adams, D.C.

En: Ecosystem Services, Vol. 29, 2018, p. 31-39.

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaArtículo

TY - JOUR

T1 - Consumer demand for urban forest ecosystem services and disservices: Examining trade-offs using choice experiments and best-worst scaling

AU - Soto, J.R.

AU - Escobedo, F.J.

AU - Khachatryan, H.

AU - Adams, D.C.

N1 - Export Date: 14 December 2017 Correspondence Address: Escobedo, F.J.; Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Biology Program, Universidad del Rosario, Kr 26 No 63B-48, Colombia; email: franciscoj.escobedo@urosario.edu.co Funding details: USDA, U.S. Department of Agriculture Funding details: FLA-FOR-005278 Funding text: We thank the United States Department of Agriculture’s McIntire-Stennis program and Florida Agricultural research project for funding this project (FLA-FOR-005278). We also thank Andrew Koeser for providing suggestions and photos for the survey and the reviewers of this manuscript. Appendix A References: Adams, D.C., Bwenge, F., Lee, D.J., Larkin, S., Alavalapati, J.R.R., Public preferences for controlling upland invasive plants in state parks: application of a choice model (2011) Forest Policy Econ., 13 (6), pp. 465-472; Allen, K.E., Moore, R., Moving beyond the exchange value in the nonmarket valuation of ecosystem services (2016) Ecosyst. Serv., 18, pp. 78-86; Barrena, J., Nahuelhual, L., Báez, A., Schiappacasse, I., Cerda, C., Valuing cultural ecosystem services: agricultural heritage in Chiloé island, southern Chile (2014) Ecosyst. Serv., 7, pp. 66-75; Bertram, C., Rehdanz, K., The role of urban green space for human well-being (2015) Ecol. Econ., 120, pp. 139-152; Campbell, D., Erdem, S., Position bias in best-worst scaling surveys: a case study on trust in institutions (2015) Am. J. Agric. Econ., 97, pp. 526-545; Chen, W.Y., Hua, J., Citizens' distrust of government and their protest responses in a contingent valuation study of urban heritage trees in Guangzhou, China (2015) J. Environ. Manage., 155, pp. 40-48; Coast, J., Salisbury, C., De Berker, D., Noble, A., Horrocks, S., Peters, T.J., Flynn, T.N., Preferences for aspects of a dermatology consultation (2006) Br. J. Dermatol., 155 (2), pp. 387-392; Dobbs, C., Escobedo, F., Zipperer, W., A framework for developing urban forest ecosystem services and goods indicators (2011) Landscape Urban Planning, 99, pp. 196-206; Dillman, D.A., Smyth, J.D., Christian, L.M., Internet, Mail, and Mixed-Mode Surveys: The Tailored Design Method (2009), 3rd ed. John Wiley & Sons Inc Hoboken, NJ; Escobedo, F., Luley, C., Bond, J., Staudhammer, C., Bartel, C., A hurricane debris and damage assessment for Florida urban forests (2009) Arboricult. Urban For., 35 (2), pp. 100-106; Escobedo, F.J., Kroeger, T., Wagner, J.E., Urban forests and pollution mitigation: Analyzing ecosystem services and disservices (2011) Environ. Pollut., 159 (8), pp. 2078-2087; Escobedo, F.J., Adams, D.C., Timilsina, N., Urban forest structure effects on property value (2015) Ecosyst. Serv., 12, pp. 209-217; Flynn, T.N., Louviere, J.J., Peters, T.J., Coast, J., Best–worst scaling: what it can do for health care research and how to do it (2007) J. Health Econ., 26, pp. 171-189; Flynn, T., Louviere, J., Peters, T., Coast, J., Estimating preferences for a dermatology consultation using Best-Worst Scaling: comparison of various methods of analysis (2008) BMC Med. Res. Methodology, 8, pp. 76-88; Giergiczny, M., Kronenberg, J., From valuation to governance: Using choice experiment to value street trees (2014) Ambio, 43 (4), pp. 492-501; Gómez-Baggethun, E., Barton, D.N., Classifying and valuing ecosystem services for urban planning (2013) Ecol. Econ., 86, pp. 235-245; Greene, W.H., Econometric analysis (2003), Prentice Hall NY, New York; Haab, T.C., McConnell, K.E., Referendum models and negative willingness to pay: alternative solutions (1997) J. Environ. Econ. Manage., 32 (2), pp. 251-270; Hensher, D.A., Rose, J.M., Greene, W.H., Applied Choice Analysis (2015), Cambridge University Press; Horn, J., Escobedo, F.J., Hinkle, R., Hostetler, M., Timilsina, N., The role of composition, invasives, and maintenance emissions on urban forest carbon stocks (2015) Environ. Manage., 55 (2), pp. 431-442; Khachatryan, H., Campbell, B., Hall, C., Behe, B., Yue, C., Dennis, J., The effects of individual environmental concerns and willingness to pay for sustainable plant attributes (2014) HortScience, 49 (1), pp. 69-75; Khachatryan, H., Suh, D.H., Zhou, G., Dukes, M., (2016), Sustainable urban landscaping: consumer preferences and willingness to pay for turfgrass fertilizers. Can. J. Agric. Econ. (accepted); Koeser, A.K., Klein, R.W., Hasing, G., Northrop, R.J., Factors driving professional and public urban tree risk perception (2015) Urban Forest. Urban Greening, 14 (4), pp. 968-974; Kosoy, N., Corbera, E., Payments for ecosystem services as commodity fetishism (2010) Ecol. Econ., 69 (6), pp. 1228-1236; Kreye, M.M., Adams, D.C., Escobedo, F.J., Soto, J.R., Does policy process influence public values for forest-water resource protection in Florida? (2016) Ecol. Econ., 129, pp. 122-131; Latinopoulos, D., Mallios, Z., Latinopoulos, P., Valuing the benefits of an urban park project: A contingent valuation study in Thessaloniki, Greece (2016) Land Use Policy, 55, pp. 130-141; Lo, A.Y., Jim, C.Y., Protest response and willingness to pay for culturally significant urban trees: implications for contingent valuation method (2015) Ecol. Econ., 114, pp. 58-66; Louviere, J., Flynn, T., Carson, R.T., Discrete choice experiments are not conjoint analysis (2010) J. Choice Model, 3 (3), pp. 57-72; Louviere, J., Hensher, D., Swait, J., Stated Choice Methods—Analysis and Application (2000), Cambridge University Press; Louviere, J.J., Islam, T., A comparison of importance weights and willingness-to-pay measures derived from choice-based conjoint, constant sum scales and best–worst scaling (2008) J. Bus. Res., 61 (9), pp. 903-911; Louviere, J.J., Flynn, T.N., Marley, A.A.J., Best Worst Scaling: Theory (2015), Cambridge University Press Methods and Applications; Lusk, J.L., Parker, N., Consumer preferences for fat in ground beef (2009) J. Agric. Appl. Econ., 41 (1), pp. 75-90; Lusk, J.L., Briggeman, B.C., Food values (2009) Am. J. Agric. Econ., 91 (1), pp. 184-196; Mas-Colell, A., Whinston, M.D., Green, J.R., Microeconomic theory (1995), Oxford University Press New York; Pandit, R., Laband, D.N., Energy savings from tree shade (2010) Ecol. Econ., 69 (6), pp. 1324-1329; Siriwardena, S.D., Boyle, K.J., Holmes, T.P., Wiseman, P.E., The implicit value of tree cover in the US: A meta-analysis of hedonic property value studies (2016) Ecol. Econ., 128, pp. 68-76; Soto, J.R., Adams, D.C., Escobedo, F.J., Landowner attitudes and willingness to accept compensation from forest carbon offsets: application of best–worst choice modeling in Florida USA (2016) For. Policy Econ., 63, pp. 35-42; Tadaki, M., Allen, W., Sinner, J., Revealing ecological processes or imposing social rationalities? The politics of bounding and measuring ecosystem services (2015) Ecol. Econ., 118, pp. 168-176; Timilsina, N., Staudhammer, C., Escobedo, F.J., Lawrence, A., Tree biomass, wood waste yield, and carbon storage changes in an urban forest (2014) Landscape Urban Planning, 127, pp. 18-27; Train, K.E., Discrete Choice Methods with Simulation (2003), Cambridge University Press Cambridge, UK; US Census Bureau, (2014), http://factfinder.census.gov, United States Census Bureau. American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates. (Accessed December 1 from), 2016; Wyman, M., Escobedo, F., Stein, T., Orfanedes, M., Northrop, R., Community leader perceptions towards coastal urban forests and hurricanes in Florida (2012) South. J. Appl. For., 36, pp. 152-158; Zhao, M., Escobedo, F.J., Staudhammer, C., Spatial patterns of a subtropical, coastal urban forest: Implications for land tenure, hurricanes, and invasives (2010) Urban For. Urban Green., 9, pp. 205-214

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Many studies value urban ecosystem service benefits using residents’ willingness to pay and supply-side analyses of ecosystem attributes. But, few studies account for consumer demand and ecosystem disservices. To address this gap we surveyed 1052 homeowners eliciting consumer demand for key urban forest ecosystem attributes and service-disservice levels in both their properties and surrounding neighborhood. We use an approach integrating focus group, field data, and surveys to identify consumer preferences and trade-offs between urban forest ecosystem structure-functional attributes and their level of services and disservices. This method, called best worst choice, produces more estimates of utility while reducing the likelihood of introducing biases associated with human cognitive tendencies. Results indicate that consumer choices for property value were highest followed by tree condition, a structural proxy for minimizing disservices, and tree shade, a functional proxy for temperature regulation. We also found evidence of trade-offs in demand for different ecosystem services, significant scale effects, and that willingness to pay for ecosystem disservices was negative. Findings suggest that management, and studies that value and map ecosystem services, using fixed scales should account for end-user demand and functional traits, as consumers can discern trade-offs in benefits and disservices across different cognitive and spatial scales. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.

AB - Many studies value urban ecosystem service benefits using residents’ willingness to pay and supply-side analyses of ecosystem attributes. But, few studies account for consumer demand and ecosystem disservices. To address this gap we surveyed 1052 homeowners eliciting consumer demand for key urban forest ecosystem attributes and service-disservice levels in both their properties and surrounding neighborhood. We use an approach integrating focus group, field data, and surveys to identify consumer preferences and trade-offs between urban forest ecosystem structure-functional attributes and their level of services and disservices. This method, called best worst choice, produces more estimates of utility while reducing the likelihood of introducing biases associated with human cognitive tendencies. Results indicate that consumer choices for property value were highest followed by tree condition, a structural proxy for minimizing disservices, and tree shade, a functional proxy for temperature regulation. We also found evidence of trade-offs in demand for different ecosystem services, significant scale effects, and that willingness to pay for ecosystem disservices was negative. Findings suggest that management, and studies that value and map ecosystem services, using fixed scales should account for end-user demand and functional traits, as consumers can discern trade-offs in benefits and disservices across different cognitive and spatial scales. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.

U2 - 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.11.009

DO - 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.11.009

M3 - Artículo

VL - 29

SP - 31

EP - 39

JO - Ecosystem Services

JF - Ecosystem Services

SN - 2212-0416

ER -