Children’s Imaginaries of Robots for Playing With

Adriana Maria Rios Rincon, William Ricardo Rodriguez Duenas, Daniel Alejandro Quiroga Torres, Antonio Miguel Cruz, Andrés Felipe Bohórquez

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a una revistaArtículorevisión exhaustiva

Resumen

Children with severe motor impairment due to cerebral palsy have difficulties engaging in play, although they want to play games that typically developing children play. The barriers imposed by motor impairments against engaging in play can be addressed through the use of robots. We aim to identify how children, who have extensive experience of play, imagine what a robot is and what features would make a robot good to play with. Using a qualitative description design, 19 children from urban and rural settings participated in focus groups to draw and talk about the robots they would like to exist. The data were coded and analyzed using a summative approach to content analysis. The findings revealed that the children imagined that a good robot to play with is one that has an anthropomorphic appearance, is tough and strong, has controls, and that is able to move, grab, speak, and play popular children’s games. In particular, the girls imagined that robots should be able to express positive emotions towards children. Age, gender, culture, and the physical environment in which the children lived influenced what they expected to find in a robot for playing with and how they imagined child–robot interactions.
Idioma originalInglés
PublicaciónInternational Journal of Social Robotics
DOI
EstadoPublicación electrónica previa a su impresión - jun 25 2021

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