Cardiovascular involvement in autoimmune diseases

Jenny Amaya-Amaya, Laura Montoya-Sánchez, Adriana Rojas-Villarraga

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaRevisión Literaria

21 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

© 2014 Jenny Amaya-Amaya et al.Autoimmune diseases (AD) represent a broad spectrum of chronic conditions that may afflict specific target organs or multiple systems with a significant burden on quality of life. These conditions have common mechanisms including genetic and epigenetics factors, gender disparity, environmental triggers, pathophysiological abnormalities, and certain subphenotypes. Atherosclerosis (AT) was once considered to be a degenerative disease that was an inevitable consequence of aging. However, research in the last three decades has shown that AT is not degenerative or inevitable. It is an autoimmune-inflammatory disease associated with infectious and inflammatory factors characterized by lipoprotein metabolism alteration that leads to immune system activation with the consequent proliferation of smooth muscle cells, narrowing arteries, and atheroma formation. Both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms have been proposed to participate in the onset and progression of AT. Several risk factors, known as classic risk factors, have been described. Interestingly, the excessive cardiovascular events observed in patients with ADs are not fully explained by these factors. Several novel risk factors contribute to the development of premature vascular damage. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to pathogenesis of CVD in AD.
Idioma originalEnglish (US)
PublicaciónBioMed Research International
DOI
EstadoPublished - ene 1 2014

Huella dactilar

Autoimmune Diseases
Atherosclerosis
Immune system
Atherosclerotic Plaques
Metabolism
Epigenomics
Lipoproteins
Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Blood Vessels
Muscle
Chemical vapor deposition
Immune System
Arteries
Aging of materials
Chemical activation
Cells
Quality of Life
Research

Citar esto

Amaya-Amaya, Jenny ; Montoya-Sánchez, Laura ; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana. / Cardiovascular involvement in autoimmune diseases. En: BioMed Research International. 2014.
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Cardiovascular involvement in autoimmune diseases. / Amaya-Amaya, Jenny; Montoya-Sánchez, Laura; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana.

En: BioMed Research International, 01.01.2014.

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a RevistaRevisión Literaria

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AU - Montoya-Sánchez, Laura

AU - Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

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AB - © 2014 Jenny Amaya-Amaya et al.Autoimmune diseases (AD) represent a broad spectrum of chronic conditions that may afflict specific target organs or multiple systems with a significant burden on quality of life. These conditions have common mechanisms including genetic and epigenetics factors, gender disparity, environmental triggers, pathophysiological abnormalities, and certain subphenotypes. Atherosclerosis (AT) was once considered to be a degenerative disease that was an inevitable consequence of aging. However, research in the last three decades has shown that AT is not degenerative or inevitable. It is an autoimmune-inflammatory disease associated with infectious and inflammatory factors characterized by lipoprotein metabolism alteration that leads to immune system activation with the consequent proliferation of smooth muscle cells, narrowing arteries, and atheroma formation. Both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms have been proposed to participate in the onset and progression of AT. Several risk factors, known as classic risk factors, have been described. Interestingly, the excessive cardiovascular events observed in patients with ADs are not fully explained by these factors. Several novel risk factors contribute to the development of premature vascular damage. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to pathogenesis of CVD in AD.

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