Transitional Justice and Economic Policy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The field of transitional justice has faced several challenges in its relatively
short life span. The latest of these challenges is the claim for broadening its
scope to incorporate social justice– and development-related matters. And
in just a few years, the possibility and adequacy of thicker or more holistic
conceptions of transitional justice have become mainstream. Nonetheless,
since their beginnings these new approaches have been subject to criticism
from both within and outside the field. This article describes the trajectory
of the scholarly debate on expanding transitional justice to encompass socioeconomic concerns, as well as its main limitations. It starts by exploring
the main reasons that led to the historical marginalization of socioeconomic
concerns in transitional justice theory and practice. It then considers the rationale for the implementation of broader approaches to transitional justice
and closes with a discussion of the main challenges and limitations these
proposals face.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)397-410
Number of pages14
JournalAnnual Review of Law and Social Science
Volume14
StatePublished - Oct 15 2018

Cite this

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title = "Transitional Justice and Economic Policy",
abstract = "The field of transitional justice has faced several challenges in its relativelyshort life span. The latest of these challenges is the claim for broadening itsscope to incorporate social justice– and development-related matters. Andin just a few years, the possibility and adequacy of thicker or more holisticconceptions of transitional justice have become mainstream. Nonetheless,since their beginnings these new approaches have been subject to criticismfrom both within and outside the field. This article describes the trajectoryof the scholarly debate on expanding transitional justice to encompass socioeconomic concerns, as well as its main limitations. It starts by exploringthe main reasons that led to the historical marginalization of socioeconomicconcerns in transitional justice theory and practice. It then considers the rationale for the implementation of broader approaches to transitional justiceand closes with a discussion of the main challenges and limitations theseproposals face.",
author = "{Prada Uribe}, {Maria Angelica} and Ren{\'e} Urue{\~n}a",
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language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
pages = "397--410",
journal = "Annual Review of Law and Social Science",
issn = "1550-3585",
publisher = "Annual Reviews Inc.",

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Transitional Justice and Economic Policy. / Prada Uribe, Maria Angelica; Urueña, René.

In: Annual Review of Law and Social Science, Vol. 14, 15.10.2018, p. 397-410.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Transitional Justice and Economic Policy

AU - Prada Uribe, Maria Angelica

AU - Urueña, René

PY - 2018/10/15

Y1 - 2018/10/15

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AB - The field of transitional justice has faced several challenges in its relativelyshort life span. The latest of these challenges is the claim for broadening itsscope to incorporate social justice– and development-related matters. Andin just a few years, the possibility and adequacy of thicker or more holisticconceptions of transitional justice have become mainstream. Nonetheless,since their beginnings these new approaches have been subject to criticismfrom both within and outside the field. This article describes the trajectoryof the scholarly debate on expanding transitional justice to encompass socioeconomic concerns, as well as its main limitations. It starts by exploringthe main reasons that led to the historical marginalization of socioeconomicconcerns in transitional justice theory and practice. It then considers the rationale for the implementation of broader approaches to transitional justiceand closes with a discussion of the main challenges and limitations theseproposals face.

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 397

EP - 410

JO - Annual Review of Law and Social Science

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