The secreted acid trehalase encoded by the CgATH1 gene is involved in Candida glabrata virulence

Rafael G. Lopes, Julián E. Muñoz, Ludmila M. Barros, Sergio L. Alves-Jr, Carlos P. Taborda, Boris U. Stambuk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Candida glabrata yeast is the second cause of candidiasis worldwide. Differs from other yeasts since assimilates only glucose and trehalose (a characteristic used in rapid identification tests for this pathogen) by secreting into the medium a highly active acid trehalase encoded by the CgATH1 gene. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to characterise the function of the acid trehalase in the physiopathology of C. glabrata. METHODS: Gene deletion was performed to obtain a mutant ath1Δ strain, and the ability of the ath1Δ strain to grow in trehalase, or the presence of trehalase activity in the ath1Δ yeast cells, was verified. We also tested the virulence of the ath1Δ strain in a murine model of infection. FINDINGS: The ath1Δ mutant strain grows normally in the presence of glucose, but loses its ability to grow in trehalose. Due to the high acid trehalase activity present in wild-type cells, the cytoplasmic neutral trehalase activity is only detected in the ath1Δ strain. We also observed a significantly lower virulence of the ath1Δ strain in a murine model of infection with either normal or immunocompromised mice. MAIN CONCLUSIONS: The acid trehalase is involved in the hydrolysis of external trehalose by C. glabrata, and the enzyme also plays a major virulence role during infectivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e200401
JournalMemorias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
Volume115
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 30 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology (medical)

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