The role of kinaesthetic motor imagery in promoting activation of the lumbrical muscles in the hemiparetic hand:A randomised controlled study

Jonathon O'Brien, R. Martyn Bracewell, Juan Alberto Castillo-Martínez;Juan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of the investigation who gave as result this work was to investigate the effectiveness of kinaesthetic motor imagery in the activation of the hemiplegic hand muscles following stroke. The experiment consisted of two random groups. Movements were measured after treatment. The participants were ten patients with hemiplegic hands (men who mean age was 74.4 years; mean time since stroke 3.05 months). All patients received three sessions of physical treatment based on an identical treatment protocol. Five patients were randomly assigned to an experimental group practising kinaesthetic motor imagery of a grasp using the 'lumbrical action' (experimental group). The others five (control group) followed a relaxation script. All the patients were then asked to grasp an object using the 'lumbrical action'. The grasps were recorded using an optoelectronic motion capture system. The magnitude of the extension of the index finger and the correlation of the angular displacement of the proximal phalangeal joints and the metacarpophalangeal joints were calculated. The movement time for the whole grip was calculated. The experimental group demonstrated higher extension in the index finger (p = <0.01) and they had a higher correlation coefficient (0.99) than the control group (0.77) for the displacement of the proximal interphalangeal joint and the meta carpophalangeal joints. The movement time for the experimental group was faster, although the difference was not significant.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-16
Number of pages12
JournalRevista Ciencias de la Salud
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The role of kinaesthetic motor imagery in promoting activation of the lumbrical muscles in the hemiparetic hand:A randomised controlled study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this