The opioid system in stress-induced memory disorders: From basic mechanisms to clinical implications in posttraumatic stress disorder and Alzheimer's disease

Mauricio Orlando Nava Mesa, Angelica Torres-Berrio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cognitive and emotional impairment are a serious consequence of stress exposure and are core features ofneurological and psychiatric conditions that involve memory disorders. Indeed, acute and chronic stress arehigh-risk factors for the onset of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD), two de-vastating brain disorders associated with memory dysfunction. Besides the sympathetic nervous system and thehypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis, stress response also involves the activation of the opioid system inbrain regions associated with stress regulation and memory processing. In this context, it is possible that stress-induced memory disorders may be attributed to alterations in the interaction between the neuroendocrine stresssystem and the opioid system. In this review, we: (1) describe the effects of acute and chronic stress on memory,and the modulatory role of the opioid system, (2) discuss the contribution of the opioid system to the patho-physiology of PTSD and AD, and (3) present evidence of current and potential therapies that target the opioidreceptors to treat PTSD- and AD-associated symptoms.
Translated title of the contributionEl sistema opioide en los trastornos de la memoria inducidos por estrés: de los mecanismos básicos a sus implicaciones clínicas en estrés postraumatico y la enfermedad de Alzheimer.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberdoi: 10.1016/j.pnpbp.2018.08.011
Pages (from-to)327-338
Number of pages11
JournalProgress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry
Volume88
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 10 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

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