The life of the Tea Party: Differences between Tea Party and Republican media use and political variables

Maegan Stephens, Joseph Yoo, Rachel R. Mourão, Fatima Martinez Gutierrez, Brian Baresch, Thomas J. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Tea Party has been identified by most mass media sources as a separate but related element of the Republican Party. This study adds to a new body of literature on the Tea Party by using polarization literature and survey data to (a) separate Tea Party Republicans (TPR), Tea Party Non-Republicans (TPNR), and Non–Tea Party Republicans; (b) identify the role of Tea Party affiliation (or lack thereof) on political interest and media use; and (c) assess the role of media use by these three groups on political interest and voting. This study found that partisan media plays an important role for all three groups and it especially has the strongest role for those who do not align themselves with the Republican Party. Specifically, both TPR and TPNR were more likely to be politically interested and rely on partisan media than Republicans who are not affiliated with the Tea Party.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)157-171
Number of pages15
JournalAtlantic Journal of Communication
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 26 2016
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication

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