Encuesta sobre comportamientos sexuales riesgosos y enfermedades de transmisión sexual en estudiantes adolescentes de Ciudad de La Habana, 1996.

Translated title of the contribution: Survey on risky sexual behavior and sexually transmitted diseases among adolescent students from Havana City, 1996

A. Cortés Alfaro, R. G. García Roche, M. Hernández Sánchez, P. Monterrey Gutiérrez, J. Fuentes Abreu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The observed increase of sexually transmitted diseases (STD) in Cuba aroused the interest of carrying out a study aimed at exploring risky sexual behaviours and attitudes, and histories of STD. A crosswise descriptive study was undertaken using a randomized sample taken from the universe of adolescent students in the City of Havana during 1995-96 school year. The sample was made up by 2,793 teenagers aged 11-19 years (1,370 females and 1,423 males). Previously trained experts linked to this field collected data by means of a structured interview which had been drawn up for this end. It was confirmed that more than half of adolescent students did not use condom in their sexual intercourse 57% had more than one sexual partner along the year, 40% believed it was difficult to keep only one partner whereas 35% had more than one sexual partner at the same time. Risk and protected sexual habits were noticed, with 39% for oral-genital and 21.4% for genital-anal. 22% for the interviewed adolescent said they had histories of STD.

Translated title of the contributionSurvey on risky sexual behavior and sexually transmitted diseases among adolescent students from Havana City, 1996
Original languageSpanish
Pages (from-to)120-124
Number of pages5
JournalRevista Cubana de Medicina Tropical
Volume51
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

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