Orientating peptide residues and increasing the distance between Pockets to enable fitting into MHC-TCR complex determine protection against malaria.

Magnolia Vanegas Murcia, Gladys Cifuentes, Fabiola Espejo, Luis Eduardo Vargas, Carlos Parra-Lopez, Manuel Elkin Patarroyo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

The erythrocyte binding antigen EBA-175 is a 175-kDa Plasmodium falciparum protein, which has been shown to be involved in the process of invasion of erythrocytes. It has been found that conserved peptide 1818 belonging to this protein has high red blood cell binding capacity and plays an important role in the invasion process. This peptide is neither immunogenic nor protective. Peptide 1818 analogues had some of their previously recognized critical red blood cell binding residues substituted for amino acids having similar volume or mass but different polarity to make them fit into HLA-DRβ1*1101 molecules; these 1818 peptide analogues were then synthesized and inoculated into Aotus nancymaae monkeys, generating different immunogenic and/or protective immune responses. Short structures such as 310-helix, classical, or distorted type-III β-turns were found in the immunogenic and protective peptides once the secondary structure had been analyzed by NMR and its structure correlated with its immunological properties. These data suggest that peptide flexibility may lead to better fitting into immune system molecules, therefore making them excellent candidates for consideration as components of a subunit-based, multicomponent synthetic antimalarial vaccine.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6545 - 6553
Number of pages8
JournalBiochemistry
Volume43
Issue number21
StatePublished - 2004

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