Muscle strength cut-offs for the detection of metabolic syndrome in a nonrepresentative sample of collegiate students from Colombia

Antonio Garcia-Hermoso, Alejandra Tordecilla-Sanders, Jorge Enrique Correa-Bautista, Mark D. Peterson, Mikel Izquierdo, Aura Cristina Quino-Ávila, Carolina Sandoval-Cuellar, Katherine González-Ruíz, Robinson Ramírez-Vélez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Evidence shows an association between grip strength and health; however, grip strength cut-offs for the detection of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in Latin American populations are scarce. The purpose of this study was to determine cut-offs of normalized grip strength (NGS) for the detection of MetS in a large nonrepresentative sample of a collegiate student population from Colombia. Methods: A total of 1795 volunteers (61.4% female, age = 20.68 ± 3.10 years, mean ± SD), ranging between 18 and 30 years of age participated in the study. Strength was estimated using a handheld dynamometer and normalized to body mass (handgrip strength (kg)/body mass (kg)). Anthropometrics, serum lipids indices, blood pressure, and fasting plasma glucose were measured. Body composition was measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis. MetS was defined as including ≥3 of the 5 metabolic abnormalities according to the International Diabetes Federation definition. A metabolic risk score was computed from the following components: waist circumference, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, glucose, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Results: Receiver operating curve analysis showed significant discriminatory accuracy of NGS in identifying the thresholds and risk categories. Lower strength was associated with increased prevalence of MetS. In males, weak, intermediate, and strong NGS values at these points were <0.466, 0.466–0.615, >0.615, respectively. In females, these cut-off points were <0.332, 0.332–0.437, >0.437, respectively. Conclusion: Our sex-specific cut-offs of NGS could be incorporated into a clinical setting for identifying college students at cardiometabolic disease risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-290
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Sport and Health Science
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 5 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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