Acute effects of high-intensity interval, resistance or combined exercise protocols on testosterone – cortisol responses in inactive overweight individuals

Gina P. Velasco-Orjuela, María A. Domínguez-Sanchéz, Enrique Hernández, Jorge E. Correa-Bautista, Héctor R. Triana-Reina, Antonio García-Hermoso, Jhonatan C. Peña-Ibagon, Mikel Izquierdo, Eduardo L. Cadore, Anthony C. Hackney, Robinson Ramírez-Vélez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare the hormonal responses to one session of high-intensity interval training (HIIT, 4 × 4 min intervals at 85–95% maximum heart rate [HRmax], interspersed with 4 min of recovery at 75–85% HRmax), resistance training (RT at 50–70% of one repetition maximum 12–15 repetitions per set with 60s of recovery) or both (HIIT+RT) exercise protocol in a cohort of physical inactivity, overweight adults (age 18–30 years old). Randomized, parallel-group clinical trial among fifty-one men (23.6 ± 3.5 yr; 83.5 ± 7.8 kg; 28.0 ± 1.9 kg/m2), physical inactivity (i.e., <150 min of moderate-intensity exercise per week for >6 months), with abdominal obesity (waist circumference ≥90 cm) or body mass index ≥25 and ≤30 kg/m2 were randomized to the following 4 groups: high-intensity interval training (HIIT, n = 14), resistance training (RT, n = 12), combined high-intensity interval and resistance training (HIIT+RT, n = 13), or non-exercising control (CON, n = 12). Cortisol, total- and free-testosterone and total-testosterone/cortisol-ratio (T/C) assessments (all in serum) were determined before (pre) and 1-min post-exercise for each protocol session. Decreases in cortisol levels were −57.08 (95%CI, −75.58 to −38.58; P = 0.001; ɳ2 = 0.61) and − 37.65 (95%CI, −54.36 to −20.93; P = 0.001; ɳ2 = 0.51) in the HIIT and control group, respectively. Increases in T/C ratio were 0.022 (95%CI, 0.012 to 0.031; P = 0.001; ɳ2 = 0.49) and 0.015 (95%CI, 0.004 to 0.025; P = 0.007; ɳ2 = 0.29) in the HIIT and control group, respectively. In per-protocol analyses revealed a significant change in cortisol levels [interaction effect F(7.777), ɳ2 = 0.33] and T/C ratio [interaction effect F(5.298), ɳ2 = 0.25] between groups over time. Additionally, we showed that in both the intention-to-treat (ITT) and per protocol analyses, HIIT+RT did not change serum cortisol, total or free testosterone. The present data indicate a HIIT reduced cortisol and increased total-testosterone/cortisol-ratio levels significantly in physically inactive adults. Further study is required to determine the biological importance of these changes in hormonal responses in overweight men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)401-409
Number of pages9
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume194
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Velasco-Orjuela, G. P., Domínguez-Sanchéz, M. A., Hernández, E., Correa-Bautista, J. E., Triana-Reina, H. R., García-Hermoso, A., ... Ramírez-Vélez, R. (2018). Acute effects of high-intensity interval, resistance or combined exercise protocols on testosterone – cortisol responses in inactive overweight individuals. Physiology and Behavior, 194, 401-409. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2018.06.034
Velasco-Orjuela, Gina P. ; Domínguez-Sanchéz, María A. ; Hernández, Enrique ; Correa-Bautista, Jorge E. ; Triana-Reina, Héctor R. ; García-Hermoso, Antonio ; Peña-Ibagon, Jhonatan C. ; Izquierdo, Mikel ; Cadore, Eduardo L. ; Hackney, Anthony C. ; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson. / Acute effects of high-intensity interval, resistance or combined exercise protocols on testosterone – cortisol responses in inactive overweight individuals. In: Physiology and Behavior. 2018 ; Vol. 194. pp. 401-409.
@article{e7720a13670f481199c368457e7aebb5,
title = "Acute effects of high-intensity interval, resistance or combined exercise protocols on testosterone – cortisol responses in inactive overweight individuals",
abstract = "The purpose of this study was to compare the hormonal responses to one session of high-intensity interval training (HIIT, 4 × 4 min intervals at 85–95{\%} maximum heart rate [HRmax], interspersed with 4 min of recovery at 75–85{\%} HRmax), resistance training (RT at 50–70{\%} of one repetition maximum 12–15 repetitions per set with 60s of recovery) or both (HIIT+RT) exercise protocol in a cohort of physical inactivity, overweight adults (age 18–30 years old). Randomized, parallel-group clinical trial among fifty-one men (23.6 ± 3.5 yr; 83.5 ± 7.8 kg; 28.0 ± 1.9 kg/m2), physical inactivity (i.e., <150 min of moderate-intensity exercise per week for >6 months), with abdominal obesity (waist circumference ≥90 cm) or body mass index ≥25 and ≤30 kg/m2 were randomized to the following 4 groups: high-intensity interval training (HIIT, n = 14), resistance training (RT, n = 12), combined high-intensity interval and resistance training (HIIT+RT, n = 13), or non-exercising control (CON, n = 12). Cortisol, total- and free-testosterone and total-testosterone/cortisol-ratio (T/C) assessments (all in serum) were determined before (pre) and 1-min post-exercise for each protocol session. Decreases in cortisol levels were −57.08 (95{\%}CI, −75.58 to −38.58; P = 0.001; ɳ2 = 0.61) and − 37.65 (95{\%}CI, −54.36 to −20.93; P = 0.001; ɳ2 = 0.51) in the HIIT and control group, respectively. Increases in T/C ratio were 0.022 (95{\%}CI, 0.012 to 0.031; P = 0.001; ɳ2 = 0.49) and 0.015 (95{\%}CI, 0.004 to 0.025; P = 0.007; ɳ2 = 0.29) in the HIIT and control group, respectively. In per-protocol analyses revealed a significant change in cortisol levels [interaction effect F(7.777), ɳ2 = 0.33] and T/C ratio [interaction effect F(5.298), ɳ2 = 0.25] between groups over time. Additionally, we showed that in both the intention-to-treat (ITT) and per protocol analyses, HIIT+RT did not change serum cortisol, total or free testosterone. The present data indicate a HIIT reduced cortisol and increased total-testosterone/cortisol-ratio levels significantly in physically inactive adults. Further study is required to determine the biological importance of these changes in hormonal responses in overweight men.",
author = "Velasco-Orjuela, {Gina P.} and Dom{\'i}nguez-Sanch{\'e}z, {Mar{\'i}a A.} and Enrique Hern{\'a}ndez and Correa-Bautista, {Jorge E.} and Triana-Reina, {H{\'e}ctor R.} and Antonio Garc{\'i}a-Hermoso and Pe{\~n}a-Ibagon, {Jhonatan C.} and Mikel Izquierdo and Cadore, {Eduardo L.} and Hackney, {Anthony C.} and Robinson Ram{\'i}rez-V{\'e}lez",
year = "2018",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.physbeh.2018.06.034",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "194",
pages = "401--409",
journal = "Physiology and Behavior",
issn = "0031-9384",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

Velasco-Orjuela, GP, Domínguez-Sanchéz, MA, Hernández, E, Correa-Bautista, JE, Triana-Reina, HR, García-Hermoso, A, Peña-Ibagon, JC, Izquierdo, M, Cadore, EL, Hackney, AC & Ramírez-Vélez, R 2018, 'Acute effects of high-intensity interval, resistance or combined exercise protocols on testosterone – cortisol responses in inactive overweight individuals', Physiology and Behavior, vol. 194, pp. 401-409. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2018.06.034

Acute effects of high-intensity interval, resistance or combined exercise protocols on testosterone – cortisol responses in inactive overweight individuals. / Velasco-Orjuela, Gina P.; Domínguez-Sanchéz, María A.; Hernández, Enrique; Correa-Bautista, Jorge E.; Triana-Reina, Héctor R.; García-Hermoso, Antonio; Peña-Ibagon, Jhonatan C.; Izquierdo, Mikel; Cadore, Eduardo L.; Hackney, Anthony C.; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson.

In: Physiology and Behavior, Vol. 194, 01.10.2018, p. 401-409.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acute effects of high-intensity interval, resistance or combined exercise protocols on testosterone – cortisol responses in inactive overweight individuals

AU - Velasco-Orjuela, Gina P.

AU - Domínguez-Sanchéz, María A.

AU - Hernández, Enrique

AU - Correa-Bautista, Jorge E.

AU - Triana-Reina, Héctor R.

AU - García-Hermoso, Antonio

AU - Peña-Ibagon, Jhonatan C.

AU - Izquierdo, Mikel

AU - Cadore, Eduardo L.

AU - Hackney, Anthony C.

AU - Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson

PY - 2018/10/1

Y1 - 2018/10/1

N2 - The purpose of this study was to compare the hormonal responses to one session of high-intensity interval training (HIIT, 4 × 4 min intervals at 85–95% maximum heart rate [HRmax], interspersed with 4 min of recovery at 75–85% HRmax), resistance training (RT at 50–70% of one repetition maximum 12–15 repetitions per set with 60s of recovery) or both (HIIT+RT) exercise protocol in a cohort of physical inactivity, overweight adults (age 18–30 years old). Randomized, parallel-group clinical trial among fifty-one men (23.6 ± 3.5 yr; 83.5 ± 7.8 kg; 28.0 ± 1.9 kg/m2), physical inactivity (i.e., <150 min of moderate-intensity exercise per week for >6 months), with abdominal obesity (waist circumference ≥90 cm) or body mass index ≥25 and ≤30 kg/m2 were randomized to the following 4 groups: high-intensity interval training (HIIT, n = 14), resistance training (RT, n = 12), combined high-intensity interval and resistance training (HIIT+RT, n = 13), or non-exercising control (CON, n = 12). Cortisol, total- and free-testosterone and total-testosterone/cortisol-ratio (T/C) assessments (all in serum) were determined before (pre) and 1-min post-exercise for each protocol session. Decreases in cortisol levels were −57.08 (95%CI, −75.58 to −38.58; P = 0.001; ɳ2 = 0.61) and − 37.65 (95%CI, −54.36 to −20.93; P = 0.001; ɳ2 = 0.51) in the HIIT and control group, respectively. Increases in T/C ratio were 0.022 (95%CI, 0.012 to 0.031; P = 0.001; ɳ2 = 0.49) and 0.015 (95%CI, 0.004 to 0.025; P = 0.007; ɳ2 = 0.29) in the HIIT and control group, respectively. In per-protocol analyses revealed a significant change in cortisol levels [interaction effect F(7.777), ɳ2 = 0.33] and T/C ratio [interaction effect F(5.298), ɳ2 = 0.25] between groups over time. Additionally, we showed that in both the intention-to-treat (ITT) and per protocol analyses, HIIT+RT did not change serum cortisol, total or free testosterone. The present data indicate a HIIT reduced cortisol and increased total-testosterone/cortisol-ratio levels significantly in physically inactive adults. Further study is required to determine the biological importance of these changes in hormonal responses in overweight men.

AB - The purpose of this study was to compare the hormonal responses to one session of high-intensity interval training (HIIT, 4 × 4 min intervals at 85–95% maximum heart rate [HRmax], interspersed with 4 min of recovery at 75–85% HRmax), resistance training (RT at 50–70% of one repetition maximum 12–15 repetitions per set with 60s of recovery) or both (HIIT+RT) exercise protocol in a cohort of physical inactivity, overweight adults (age 18–30 years old). Randomized, parallel-group clinical trial among fifty-one men (23.6 ± 3.5 yr; 83.5 ± 7.8 kg; 28.0 ± 1.9 kg/m2), physical inactivity (i.e., <150 min of moderate-intensity exercise per week for >6 months), with abdominal obesity (waist circumference ≥90 cm) or body mass index ≥25 and ≤30 kg/m2 were randomized to the following 4 groups: high-intensity interval training (HIIT, n = 14), resistance training (RT, n = 12), combined high-intensity interval and resistance training (HIIT+RT, n = 13), or non-exercising control (CON, n = 12). Cortisol, total- and free-testosterone and total-testosterone/cortisol-ratio (T/C) assessments (all in serum) were determined before (pre) and 1-min post-exercise for each protocol session. Decreases in cortisol levels were −57.08 (95%CI, −75.58 to −38.58; P = 0.001; ɳ2 = 0.61) and − 37.65 (95%CI, −54.36 to −20.93; P = 0.001; ɳ2 = 0.51) in the HIIT and control group, respectively. Increases in T/C ratio were 0.022 (95%CI, 0.012 to 0.031; P = 0.001; ɳ2 = 0.49) and 0.015 (95%CI, 0.004 to 0.025; P = 0.007; ɳ2 = 0.29) in the HIIT and control group, respectively. In per-protocol analyses revealed a significant change in cortisol levels [interaction effect F(7.777), ɳ2 = 0.33] and T/C ratio [interaction effect F(5.298), ɳ2 = 0.25] between groups over time. Additionally, we showed that in both the intention-to-treat (ITT) and per protocol analyses, HIIT+RT did not change serum cortisol, total or free testosterone. The present data indicate a HIIT reduced cortisol and increased total-testosterone/cortisol-ratio levels significantly in physically inactive adults. Further study is required to determine the biological importance of these changes in hormonal responses in overweight men.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85049317577&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85049317577&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.physbeh.2018.06.034

DO - 10.1016/j.physbeh.2018.06.034

M3 - Article

C2 - 29940266

AN - SCOPUS:85049317577

VL - 194

SP - 401

EP - 409

JO - Physiology and Behavior

JF - Physiology and Behavior

SN - 0031-9384

ER -