Differences in scientific collaboration and their effects on research influence: A quantitative analysis of nursing publications in Latin America (Scopus, 2005–2020)

Diana Marcela Achury Saldaña, Lidier Andrés Castañeda Rodríguez, Antonio Perianes Rodriguez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

This work is mainly aimed at the detection, visualization and description of the scientific collaboration patterns in the Nursing field in Latin America as a response to the lack of evidence on the implications of collaboration and its effects on the scientific influence in the Nursing field. For this purpose, a retrospective quantitative analysis was conducted by including all the publications classified under the code 2900 in All Science Journal Classification Codes of Scopus, corresponding to the field of General Nursing during 2005–2020. A total of 40 countries and 362,354 unique publications were analyzed, although the main subset herein consists of 18,371 unique publications authored by Latin-American institutions. World proportion of Latin-American publications in Nursing is higher than all the publications in the region. This increase is especially remarkable in the latest year of the studied period, which may result from the progressive increase in the numbers of nursing schools, the diversity in the graduate and specialization programs, the creation of scientific societies, and the many conferences carried out recently on Nursing.

Translated title of the contributionDiferencias en la colaboración científica y sus efectos en la influencia de la investigación: un análisis cuantitativo de las publicaciones de enfermería en América Latina (Scopus, 2005–2020)
Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere11047
Pages (from-to)e11047
JournalHeliyon
Volume8
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Library and Information Sciences

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