Constitutions Challenging the International Court of Justice's Jurisdiction to Adjudicate Territorial Disputes in Latin America

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Abstract

Latin America has shown an increment in litigation before the international Court of Justice (ICJ) in cases related to territorial and maritime delimitation disputes. The ICJ has been their 'natural' jurisdiction thanks to broad competence clauses included in regional dispute settlement treaties such as the Pact of Bogota. As a consequence of this increased litigation and the variety of results attained in judgements by the ICJ defining boundaries and sovereign rights around Latin America, a strange behaviour has become common place between the litigating States when they are not pleased with the result. Several Latin American States have opposed their constitutions to the ICJ judgements, invoking a particular constitutional clause, common in the regional historic embrace of the uti possidetis iuris principle, known as the 'constitutional territory clause.

Translated title of the contributionConstituciones que impugnan la competencia de la Corte Internacional de Justicia para dirimir disputas territoriales en América Latina
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)425-448
Number of pages24
JournalZeitschrift fur Auslandisches Offentliches Recht und Volkerrecht
Volume82
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Law

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