Description

Chronic kidney disease is a growing public health problem in the world and in Colombia, where there is an increasing prevalence in recent years, which has evolved from 44.7 cases per million (ppm) in 1993 to 294.6 ppm in 2004 as reported by Gomez in 2006, which is associated with biological risk factors related to complications of chronic diseases such as diabetes and high blood pressure, genetic and immunological problems and environmental exposure to chemical substances such as mercury, whether through occupational or non-working contact, air pollution, water, fish consumption, and dental treatments, among others. This situation, added to the environmental pollution caused by mercury in our country, classified as the country that produces the highest pollution of this metal per capita in the world, according to the ECLAC and OECD report on the Environmental Performance Assessments Colombia 2014, makes it a problem of special relevance in epidemiological research. In Colombia, there is a history of research in gold mining workers with exploratory approaches to the effect of chronic mercury poisoning and kidney function, with inconclusive findings, that lead us to further deepening in this field. Our research proposal includes exploring mercury levels in blood, urine and hair in patients with end-stage renal disease, compared to those of a control group of people with early-stage renal disease, with complementary verification of their interaction with pathologies such as hypertension, diabetes and other variables of clinical and demographic interest in kidney damage, a novel and current topic of research into these two important public health and environmental health problems.

Key findings

Mercurio, Toxicidad, Nefropatía, Enfermedad crónica
Short titleMercury and Kidney Disease
StatusActive
Effective start/end date4/1/196/30/21